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The 12 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

The best music of the week featuring Davido, Ciara x Tekno, Major League, Yemi Alade and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow OkayAfrica on Spotify and Apple Music to get immediate updates every week and read about some of our selections ahead.



Davido 'Nwa Baby'

Following singles "Assurances" and "Flora my Flowa" from earlier this year, afrobeats star Davido is backwith the music video for his third single "Nwa Baby." In the music video Davido, and his partner in crime, go on an adventure that sees them getting into some light trouble as they rob gas stations and dodge police.

Find out more.

Ciara & Tekno 'Freak Me'

Ciara released her new single "Freak Me," featuring Nigeria's Tekno. In a new clip, the artist gyrates alongside South African dancers in a street in Soweto. She even does the gwara gwara. The dance video was choreographed by the renowned Sinovuyo Dunywa, and styled by Rich Mnisi and Trevor Stuurman. Ciara also mentioned how Tiwa Savage inspired the track after fans pointed out similarities.

Find out more.

Major League '19 Tobetsa'

South African DJ and producer duo Major League DJz released a tribute to Pretoria house music legend DJ Mujava. The song's title, "19 Tobetsa," is a nod to a Mujava song of the same name, just without the "19." Major League's "Tobetsa" features Pretoria-based artist Focalistic. In the video, the three artists treat themselves to some Chinese food in a Chinese restaurant, while Chinese character subtitles tell a story that you and I are highly likely to not understand.

Find out more.

Yemi Alade 'Oh My Gosh'

Following a stellar set at Okayafrica's Lincoln Center show, afrobeats queen Yemi Alade is back with an infectious new track made for summer listening. "Oh My Gosh" is a sweet ballad, that sees Yemi singing about a lover that makes her feel overwhelmingly good. It sees Yemi departing from her usual dance-inducing afrobeat sound, and delivering a more sensual one that highlights her honeyed vocals.

Find out more.

Burna Boy 'Ye'

Burna Boy's "Ye" is already a classic in its own right. The song has been a fan favorite ever since it appeared on his latest album Outside—folks even argued that it should become the new Nigerian national anthem. And the song gained the afro-dancehall a new group of fans, when listeners discovered it when searching for Kanye West's album by the same name. Needless to say, we've all been anticipating the music video for the standout track, and it's finally here.

Find out more.

Guampara Music 'Cubaneatelo'

Guámpara Music shares their music video for their new single, "Cubanéatelo." Produced by JD Asere, Cuba's first independent urban music label stacked the track with voices you should know: the beastly flow of Niño Fony, the versatile rhythm of El Individuo, the reggae of Cuba Lions with the vocals of DJ Lapiz, the sultry voice of Sigrid and the poetry of Luz De Cuba.

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James BKS 'Kwele' feat. Allan Kingdom & Manu Dibango

French Cameroonian producer James BKS is the first artist signed to Idris Elba's new record label 7 Wallace. Our first reaction to "Kwele," his first single, is that it's a nice addition to that genre of placelessglobal pop associated with international sporting events. So it makes perfect sense that James BKS, with his father the legendary artist behind Soul Makossa, Manu Dibango, previously collaborated on a song for the Rio Olympics.

Find out more.

Yung Swiss 'Don't Go There' feat. Frank Casino

South African rapper Yung Swiss teamed up with fellow rapper Frank Casino for his latest video single. Titled "Don't Go There," the song is a key-laden bass-heavy trap slow burner that's dark sonically. In the video, the two rappers kick it in a mansion with a bunch of their boys and girls.

Find out more.

Burna Boy, D'Banj, 2Baba and Larry Gaaga 'Baba Nla'

Afrobeats titans unite on this massive new track from Nigerian artist Larry Gaaga. After dropping bangers featuring the likes of Davido and Wande Cole, the musician returns with "Baba Nla" a chilled out track featuring heavyweights 2Baba, D'Banj and afrofusion star Burna Boy. It's a huge collaboration which sees the trio flexing over the keyboard-heavy beat.

Find out more.

Santi 'Freaky' feat. Nonso Amadi & Bridge

"Freaky," the new single from Santi's forthcoming project, has a sinister edge to it. For the song, Santi enlists his Lagos-based emcee BRIDGE on the hook while Nonso Amadi's heartbreak-laden vocals smoothen up the rugged feel of track.

Find out more.

Fully Focus x Sauti Sol 'Melanin' (Remix)

DJ Fully Focus comes through with a head-nodding remix of Kenyan afropop band Sati Sol's hit single "Melanin," alongside Patoranking.

Olamide 'Motigbana'

YBNL chief Olamide continues his hot streak with "Motigbana," a new Killertunes-produced single that builds from an acoustic guitar riff into a highly-infectious beat. You should be familiar with the producer's top tier work in hits like "Manya" and "Nowo."

Find out more.

Follow OkayAfrica on Spotify and Apple Music to get immediate updates every week.




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(From left to right) Stéphane Bak and Marc Zinga in 'The Mercy of the Jungle.' Photo courtesy of TIFF.

Congolese Actor Stéphane Bak on His Intense Experience Shooting 'The Mercy of the Jungle' In Uganda

We catch up with the actor after the film made its North American premiere at TIFF.

When actor Stéphane Bak first got the script for The Mercy of the Jungle (La Miséricorde de la Jungle), he knew there was one person he had to consult: his father. "My dad did school me about this," he says. While Bak was born and raised in France, his parents had emigrated from what was then Zaire in the 1980s—before the events of the movie, and not exactly in the same area, but close enough to be able to pass on firsthand knowledge of the simmering ethnic tensions that underpin the action.

The story takes place in 1998, just after the outbreak of the Second Congo War—which came hot on the heels of the First Congo War. Two Rwandan soldiers find themselves separated from their company and have to make a harrowing trek through the jungle to link back up with their regiment. Bak plays Private Faustin, the young recruit hunting Hutu rebels to avenge his murdered family, a foil to Marc Zinga's seasoned Sergeant Xavier. As a Congolese militia swarms the area, and it becomes increasingly difficult to tell enemies from friends, the two are forced off the road and into the thick vegetation.

Their journey is physically difficult, but the jungle also nurtures them, providing food, water, and shelter. "The title is very explicit in a way," says Bak. It is the human beings they encounter, from rival soldiers and militiamen to the hostile security forces guarding illegal gold mining operations, who bring sudden danger and violence. The challenges are conveyed as much through the actors' physicality as through the minimal dialogue. As for the strain on his face, Bak says it was all real. "To be honest, it was very difficult," he says of the shoot, which took him 25 days. "I had to learn my accent in two weeks." Prior to commencing, there was training with the Ugandan army for realism. Due to the ongoing conflicts in the DRC, the movie itself was shot in Uganda.

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Brazil Has Made Yoruba an Official Language

The language will also be incorporated into primary and secondary school curriculum in the country, says the Minister of Culture.

Yoruba history and culture has an undeniably strong presence in Brazilian society, due of course, to the Transatlantic slave trade which brought millions of enslaved West Africans to the Americas. Despite the inhumanity they faced, many managed to keep their ancestral culture and traditions alive.

Centuries have passed, and Yoruba influences still continue to thrive in various regions of the country, as many Brazilians maintain a strong relationship with the language and religion. Its influence can be seen through the music, food and spiritual practices of various communities. Last month the Ooni of Ife—the spiritual leader of the Yoruba people—visited the country, where he was met by crowds of Black Brazilians who turned up to pay their respects.

This connection will likely remain strong for future generations, as the language has now become an official foreign language in the country.

WATCH: How Ilê Aiyê Brought Blackness Back to Carnival

Brazil's Minister of Culture, Dr. Sérgio Sá Leitão, has said that the language will now be incorporated into primary and secondary school curriculum, reports the Nigerian Voice.

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This EP Blends the Afro-Brazilian Rhythms of Bahia With Bass Music

Get into Telefunksoul and Felipe Pomar's Ré_Con Ba$$ EP.

Brazilian producers Felipe Pomar (of TrapFunk & Alivio) and Telefunksoul come through with a dizzyingly energetic EP in the form of Ré_Con Ba$$.

Telefunksoul, who happens to be one of the main promoters of Bahia Bass music, came up with the concept of exploring the rhythms coming out of Recôncavo of Bahia and showing how they can fit into bass music.

Through the 7-track Ré_Con Ba$$ EP, him and Pomar mold and transform the diverse music of Bahia, fusing its rhythms with afrobeat, future house, deep house and much more.

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