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The 9 Songs You Need To Hear This Week

The best music of the week featuring Sade, Cassper Nyovest x Davido, Ostinato Records, Oumou Sangaré and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow OkayAfrica on Spotify and Apple Music to get immediate updates every week and read about some of our selections ahead.


Sade "Flower of the Universe"

Late last month, news spread that iconic Nigerian-British singer Sade would release her first original song in over seven years, as part of the soundtrack for Ava DuVernay's A Wrinkle in Time. It is now time to rejoice, because the No I.D.-produced track, entitled "Flower of the Universe" is here.

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Vintage, Golden Era Sudanese Sounds

You really need to hear this gorgeous mixtape from Ostinato Records. The label's founder Vik Sohonie shared details on his upcoming compilation of sounds from Khartoum and Omdurman with us this week.

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Odunsi, Zamir & Santi "Alté Cruise"

Nigerian cool kids Santi, Odunsi and Zamir drop the hazy new single, "Alté Cruise," and its accompanying grainy music video. Santi writes, "We are family of young musicians, model, filmmakers, fashion designers, doing our thing slightly differently from the mainstream. Because of that, In Nigeria they branded our scene Alté. So we just decided to own that narrative. So this song depicts our daily lives, our lifestyle on this side of this Nigerian Scene that's growing everyday."

Cassper Nyovest x Davido

In mid-January, Cassper Nyovest and Davido revealed they were working on some music together. Less than a month later, the song is here, and it comes with a video, too. "Check On You" is a hybrid of afrobeats and South African house, with some sprinkles of rap and pop.

Oumou Sangaré Remixes

Nigerian producer Krizbeatz, PEDRO, Sampha and others re-worked tracks from the Malian singer Oumou Sangaré's last album. It's just a taste of the fully updated Mogoya Remixed, which drops digitally March 2 on Nø Førmat!

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Kannon "Stay Up" & "Cavalli"

Kannon is a protégé of Nigerian producer Sarz (the man behind Drake and Wizkid's "Come Closer"). He's worked with Sarz, Dremo, Ichaba, Dapo Tuburna and many more. In his two latest singles—"Stay Up" and "Cavalli"—he balls like Ronaldo and showcases why he's one to watch.

Kannon's "Stay Up" and "Cavalli" are available everywhere now from Okaymusic.

Nakhane "Interloper"

South African musician Nakhane just released the visual to "Interloper," a song from his upcoming album, You Will Not Die. The minimalistic video is reminiscent of the 90s, as Nakhane rocks a shiny suit like Diddy and Mase in their days.

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Victor Collins 'Fidelia' EP

Nigerian singer and songwriter Victor Collins comes through with a solid 6-track EP Fidelia. Collins says the EP, whose title means faithful, is dedicated to all African women.

Fidelia is available everywhere now from Okaymusic

Subterranean Wavelength 'Wiretribe'

South African electronic music label Subterranean Wavelength's Wiretribe compilation consists of artists signed to their roster. Just like with most of the label's releases, the basis of Wiretribe is a boundless approach to production—boom bap, trap, soul, dubstep and even house lend their influences to the 11 songs featured on the compilation.

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Follow OkayAfrica on Spotify and Apple Music to get immediate updates every week



Bobi Wine Set to Return Home to Uganda

Uganda authorities have already warned against welcoming rallies for the musician.

Bobi Wine is making his way home to Uganda after spending just over two weeks in the United States seeking medical treatment for injuries he sustained after being tortured while in military custody, he says.

The opposition lawmaker, who is currently out on bail following an alleged attack on President Yoweri Museveni's motorcade, shared the news on Twitter with a photo of himself at the airport this morning. "Headed Home," he wrote as a caption.

READ: "I'm Proud to Be Persecuted For the Truth:" Bobi Wine on the Fight for Freedom in Uganda

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News Brief

The Trailer for Faraday Okoro's Tribeca Film 'Nigerian Prince' Is Here

The film is due to hit U.S. theaters October 19.

The trailer for Nigerian filmmaker Faraday Okoro's debut feature Nigerian Prince is here, Shadow and Act reports.

We're a month away from the film landing in U.S. theaters and On-Demand since the film got acquired by Vertical Entertainment.

Revisit the synopsis below.

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(From left to right) Stéphane Bak and Marc Zinga in 'The Mercy of the Jungle.' Photo courtesy of TIFF.

Congolese Actor Stéphane Bak on His Intense Experience Shooting 'The Mercy of the Jungle' In Uganda

We catch up with the actor after the film made its North American premiere at TIFF.

When actor Stéphane Bak first got the script for The Mercy of the Jungle (La Miséricorde de la Jungle), he knew there was one person he had to consult: his father. "My dad did school me about this," he says. While Bak was born and raised in France, his parents had emigrated from what was then Zaire in the 1980s—before the events of the movie, and not exactly in the same area, but close enough to be able to pass on firsthand knowledge of the simmering ethnic tensions that underpin the action.

The story takes place in 1998, just after the outbreak of the Second Congo War—which came hot on the heels of the First Congo War. Two Rwandan soldiers find themselves separated from their company and have to make a harrowing trek through the jungle to link back up with their regiment. Bak plays Private Faustin, the young recruit hunting Hutu rebels to avenge his murdered family, a foil to Marc Zinga's seasoned Sergeant Xavier. As a Congolese militia swarms the area, and it becomes increasingly difficult to tell enemies from friends, the two are forced off the road and into the thick vegetation.

Their journey is physically difficult, but the jungle also nurtures them, providing food, water, and shelter. "The title is very explicit in a way," says Bak. It is the human beings they encounter, from rival soldiers and militiamen to the hostile security forces guarding illegal gold mining operations, who bring sudden danger and violence. The challenges are conveyed as much through the actors' physicality as through the minimal dialogue. As for the strain on his face, Bak says it was all real. "To be honest, it was very difficult," he says of the shoot, which took him 25 days. "I had to learn my accent in two weeks." Prior to commencing, there was training with the Ugandan army for realism. Due to the ongoing conflicts in the DRC, the movie itself was shot in Uganda.

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