News Brief

South African Coming-Of-Age Drama 'Vaya' Heads To Netflix This November Via Ava DuVernay's ARRAY

ARRAY recently announced they have acquired the film by Nigerian filmmaker Akin Omotoso with a national screening tour to come.

Ava DuVernay's ARRAY has acquired Vaya—a South African coming-of-age drama from Nigerian filmmaker Akin Omotoso, Deadline reports.

This is the independent film distribution and resource collective's 19th feature to pick up, as it's set for a national screening tour starting in October and is due for a November 1 Netfilx debut.


The synopsis from ARRAY reads:

Paying homage to the Tsotsitaal namesake meaning "to go", filmmaker Akin Omotoso's VAYA chronicles the innocence lost by three young South Africans who journey away from their rural homes on a train bound for Johannesburg. Stirring and suspenseful, the intertwining stories of strangers struggling to survive culminate in an explosive moment based on real accounts.

"We're excited to add this vibrant work to Array's catalog and we look forward to sharing its message of hope in the face of adversity with an international audience," Tilane Jones, ARRAY vice president, tells Deadline.

Check out the trailer below.

Vaya made it's world premiere at TIFF 2016 where it was well received and landed Omotoso the Africa Movie Academy Award for Best Director.

The film stars Mncedisi Shabangu, Zimkhitha Nyoka, Nomonde Mbusi, Sihle Xaba, Warren Masemola, Sibusiso Msimang and Azwile Chamane.

Listen to A-Reece’s Surprise EP ‘And I’m Only 21’

A-Reece just dropped an EP on the same date he dropped his albums Paradise and FMTYAY.

Those who have TVs say A-Reece stole the show on the B.E.T Hip-Hop Awards' South African cypher, in which he sparred fellow lyricists Shane Eagle and Nasty C.

As if it was all part of a plan, while the hype for his verse is at its peak, the MC releases a surprise five-track EP. Its title, I'm Only 21, is a reminder that one of the country's most potent lyricists is only 21 years of age.

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Tay Iwar. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Tay Iwar Is Nigeria's Hidden Gem

In a rare interview, the reclusive Nigerian singer and producer talks in-depth about writing and producing his new EP 1997, his forthcoming album Gemini and Nigeria's 'Alté' movement.

Tay Iwar wants some space. The word is the title of one of three songs on his new EP and also one that comes up during our interview, conducted via voice notes and texts on Whatsapp from his base in Abuja—a long way from Lagos which remains Nigeria's music hub.

The choice of the nation's quieter capital over the bustle of its music metropolis is a deliberate one for Iwar and one which fevers his reputation as a recluse and cult figure in Nigerian music circles. This especially happens among the subculture referred to as "alté"—an abbreviation of the word alternative which is used to denote the independent movement that is free from the flash and perceived vacuity of afropop. Precise definitions of the word vary but common denominators include introspection and melancholia, as well as trap and R&B.;

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Photo: Dancers of the Asociación Cultural Afro Chincha Perú via Wikimedia Commons

After Decades of Erasure, Afro-Peruvians Will Finally be Counted in the National Census

Despite an Afro-Peruvian cultural resurgence not a lot has been done to increase the population's visibility on a political level.

In 2009, Peru became the first Latin American country to issue an official public apology to its afrodescendiente population for centuries of "abuse, exclusion, and discrimination." Since then, many have criticized it as more of a symbolic gesture, especially for its failure to mention slavery. It was also seen as a way for the government to highlight Afro-Peruvian culture over making any substantive improvements to the material conditions of Afro-Peruvian communities.

Enter the census, which can play an important role in compelling the Peruvian government to address systemic inequality related to education, poverty, and health. Unfortunately, the last time Peru made a formal attempt to keep track of its African descended population via the census was in 1940.

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