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Barthélémy Toguo 'Road to Exile.' Photo courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

Barthélémy Toguo's Exhibition Explores the Push & Pull of the Global Migration Crisis

The Cameroonian artist specifically dives into the desire of young Africans wanting to seek a better life in 'The Beauty of Our Voice' at the Parrish Art Museum.

In the last year, stories about the global migration crisis have been at the forefront of our news feeds and especially in the work of Cameroonian artist, Barthélémy Toguo.

In his exhibition, showing at the Parrish Art Museum until October 14, Toguo addresses the migrant and refugee crisis; specifically, the desire of young Africans to escape in hopes of a better life. The centerpiece of Toguo's exhibition, Road to Exile, is a life sized boat filled to the brim with bags representing the material things people who migrate bring along with them on their journey. Toguo notes that the bed of glass bottles, which surround the boat, simultaneously show the danger and the fragility of the migrants' journey.


"The water is an element that can transport people from one point to another but at the same time it can kill," says Toguo in an email to OkayAfrica. "It is a trial of difficulties and the cause of many misfortunes, [like] in the Mediterranean Sea, for example."

Barthélémy Toguo. Photo courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

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Barthélémy Toguo's 'Road to Exile.' Photo courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

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Mapped along the walls of the museum are postcards from Toguo's interdisciplinary project titled Head Above Water. The postcards serve as a map of Kosovo, Lagos, Johannesburg, Cuba, Tunisia, Hiroshima, Auschwitz and Birkenau, Mexico, Rwanda, London, Cairo and most recently, The Hamptons, through the eyes of everyday citizens. The premise of the project involves Toguo asking people living in challenging socio-political situations to write something about their lives, dreams, and hopes on a postcard addressed to him.

"I chose the title, Head Above Water, for this project to show the seriousness of the situation in which many of the people I talked to find themselves [in]; they often suffer so much that they are fed up and are close to suicide—hence barely holding their head above water," Toguo says.

"The project has evolved, and essentially, it gives voice to everyone to talk about their experiences and their lives. It's a generous project."

In The Hamptons, Toguo received postcards from many groups, including Native Americans hailing from Southampton's Shinnecock Reservation. By exploring questions about belonging in the United States and who is allowed to call this country a home, Toguo learned that members of the Shinnecock Nation are considered foreigners in Southampton.

"They do not own the land in the Hamptons, and they live in difficult social conditions, with very low monthly incomes," Toguo adds.

Barthélémy Toguo's 'Head Above Water.' Photo courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

Barthélémy Toguo's 'Head Above Water.' Photo courtesy of Parrish Art Museum.

In one postcard a person writes "The American society is broken. Many of us are separate, not together. It is the rich, the poor and somewhere in between. I am somewhere in between, but I am lost too."

Other pieces in Toguo's exhibition speak to questions of police brutality, political corruption in African countries, sustainability, capitalism, trade and community. The exhibition is an amalgamation of Toguo's understanding of his role as an artist, which is to chronicle injustice as a way to remedy it.

Corinne Erni, senior curator of ArtsReach and special projects at The Parrish Museum of Art considers Toguo's work as "an invitation to a conversation rather than a message."

"I see it as strong, exuberant artwork with a commanding presence that draws us into the complex and unjust world that we all inhabit and contribute to," she says.

"It's through Barthélémy's aesthetics and mastery of the various artforms that he, as an artist, is able to lure us beyond the surface and into his world where he awaits as the multi-faceted African and global citizen who cares deeply about his people and his continent. He shows us hard truths—racism, post-colonial oppression, forced migration and exile, and the unfair trade conditions that for centuries have impoverished the global South. We want to see more, because the work is so beautiful and celebrates our—though hugely flawed—humanity which allows us get a little bit closer to the "other."

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(From left to right) Stéphane Bak and Marc Zinga in 'The Mercy of the Jungle.' Photo courtesy of TIFF.

Congolese Actor Stéphane Bak on His Intense Experience Shooting 'The Mercy of the Jungle' In Uganda

We catch up with the actor after the film made its North American premiere at TIFF.

When actor Stéphane Bak first got the script for The Mercy of the Jungle (La Miséricorde de la Jungle), he knew there was one person he had to consult: his father. "My dad did school me about this," he says. While Bak was born and raised in France, his parents had emigrated from what was then Zaire in the 1980s—before the events of the movie, and not exactly in the same area, but close enough to be able to pass on firsthand knowledge of the simmering ethnic tensions that underpin the action.

The story takes place in 1998, just after the outbreak of the Second Congo War—which came hot on the heels of the First Congo War. Two Rwandan soldiers find themselves separated from their company and have to make a harrowing trek through the jungle to link back up with their regiment. Bak plays Private Faustin, the young recruit hunting Hutu rebels to avenge his murdered family, a foil to Marc Zinga's seasoned Sergeant Xavier. As a Congolese militia swarms the area, and it becomes increasingly difficult to tell enemies from friends, the two are forced off the road and into the thick vegetation.

Their journey is physically difficult, but the jungle also nurtures them, providing food, water, and shelter. "The title is very explicit in a way," says Bak. It is the human beings they encounter, from rival soldiers and militiamen to the hostile security forces guarding illegal gold mining operations, who bring sudden danger and violence. The challenges are conveyed as much through the actors' physicality as through the minimal dialogue. As for the strain on his face, Bak says it was all real. "To be honest, it was very difficult," he says of the shoot, which took him 25 days. "I had to learn my accent in two weeks." Prior to commencing, there was training with the Ugandan army for realism. Due to the ongoing conflicts in the DRC, the movie itself was shot in Uganda.

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Brazil Has Made Yoruba an Official Language

The language will also be incorporated into primary and secondary school curriculum in the country, says the Minister of Culture.

Yoruba history and culture has an undeniably strong presence in Brazilian society, due of course, to the Transatlantic slave trade which brought millions of enslaved West Africans to the Americas. Despite the inhumanity they faced, many managed to keep their ancestral culture and traditions alive.

Centuries have passed, and Yoruba influences still continue to thrive in various regions of the country, as many Brazilians maintain a strong relationship with the language and religion. Its influence can be seen through the music, food and spiritual practices of various communities. Last month the Ooni of Ife—the spiritual leader of the Yoruba people—visited the country, where he was met by crowds of Black Brazilians who turned up to pay their respects.

This connection will likely remain strong for future generations, as the language has now become an official foreign language in the country.

WATCH: How Ilê Aiyê Brought Blackness Back to Carnival

Brazil's Minister of Culture, Dr. Sérgio Sá Leitão, has said that the language will now be incorporated into primary and secondary school curriculum, reports the Nigerian Voice.

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This EP Blends the Afro-Brazilian Rhythms of Bahia With Bass Music

Get into Telefunksoul and Felipe Pomar's Ré_Con Ba$$ EP.

Brazilian producers Felipe Pomar (of TrapFunk & Alivio) and Telefunksoul come through with a dizzyingly energetic EP in the form of Ré_Con Ba$$.

Telefunksoul, who happens to be one of the main promoters of Bahia Bass music, came up with the concept of exploring the rhythms coming out of Recôncavo of Bahia and showing how they can fit into bass music.

Through the 7-track Ré_Con Ba$$ EP, him and Pomar mold and transform the diverse music of Bahia, fusing its rhythms with afrobeat, future house, deep house and much more.

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