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Blitz the Ambassador's Debut Film Is a Story of Love, Betrayal & Illegal Gold Mining

'The Burial of Kojo' follows Ghanaian brothers Kwabena and Kojo, whose misfortunes and decisions brew into a vengeful and tumultuous narrative.

Samuel Bazawule aka Blitz the Ambassador is far more than a musician, lyricist and dapper suit-wearer—he's on a mission to tell eclectic, fantastical stories on Ghanaian life and love.


The TED Fellow is known for creating music videos that transport us to magical and mysterious settings, follow eccentric characters and brim with emotion and wonder. Now, he's taking his creative vision one step further with his film The Burial of Kojo: a magical realist tale of betrayal, love, sibling rivalry and gold.

The Burial of Kojo follows brothers Kwabena and Kojo, whose misfortunes and decisions brew into a vengeful and tumultuous narrative. After Kojo causes a car accident that kills Kwabena's bride, Kwabena is determined to avenge her by killing Kojo.

Knocking Kojo unconscious, Kwabena buries him in a mineshaft to die. It is up to Kojo's wife Ama and Detective Koomson to find Kojo before he meets his demise.



Inspired by true stories of Ghanaians risking their lives to mine for gold (galamsey), Blitz and cinematographer M ichael Fernandez wanted to craft a film that personalizes, instead of victimizes, this illegal act.

"Instead of centering the issues, I centered the people, which is seldom done when Hollywood makes films about Africa," he says. "Our objective was to capture the beauty, even when the circumstances weren't beautiful." Curating and capturing this beauty was no easy feat—the 600 frame storyboard is hand drawn by Blitz himself, who wanted to ensure his vision was brought to life as he imagined.

Besides telling an exciting tragedy and showcasing the beauty of Ghana and Guinea, Blitz and Fernandez created a telenovela within the film that parallels the lives of the characters. Telenovelas are a hit in Ghana, which makes this juxtaposition even more compelling to the tale, meta in its function, and playful to watch.

After an intensive 23-day shoot filled with car burning and mine diving, The Burial of Kojo is now in post-production mode. Blitz is raising money for music, editing and marketing on Kickstarter, and he hopes this will inspire more Ghanaian artists to self produce extraordinary projects—even if getting funding is difficult. Just recently, the Kickstater reached its goal of $75,000, but Blitz is looking to surpass that goal.



The Burial of Kojo looks and feels like something that stepped out of a daydream - or, for Kojo, a nightmare. We hope Blitz achieves his monetary goal so that we can see the film in its entirety. After all, the best dreams are the ones that come true.

Learn more on how to support The Burial of Kojo here.

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Tay Iwar. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Tay Iwar Is Nigeria's Hidden Gem

In a rare interview, the reclusive Nigerian singer and producer talks in-depth about writing and producing his new EP 1997, his forthcoming album Gemini and Nigeria's 'Alté' movement.

Tay Iwar wants some space. The word is the title of one of three songs on his new EP and also one that comes up during our interview, conducted via voice notes and texts on Whatsapp from his base in Abuja—a long way from Lagos which remains Nigeria's music hub.

The choice of the nation's quieter capital over the bustle of its music metropolis is a deliberate one for Iwar and one which fevers his reputation as a recluse and cult figure in Nigerian music circles. This especially happens among the subculture referred to as "alté"—an abbreviation of the word alternative which is used to denote the independent movement that is free from the flash and perceived vacuity of afropop. Precise definitions of the word vary but common denominators include introspection and melancholia, as well as trap and R&B.;

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Photo: Dancers of the Asociación Cultural Afro Chincha Perú via Wikimedia Commons

After Decades of Erasure, Afro-Peruvians Will Finally be Counted in the National Census

Despite an Afro-Peruvian cultural resurgence not a lot has been done to increase the population's visibility on a political level.

In 2009, Peru became the first Latin American country to issue an official public apology to its afrodescendiente population for centuries of "abuse, exclusion, and discrimination." Since then, many have criticized it as more of a symbolic gesture, especially for its failure to mention slavery. It was also seen as a way for the government to highlight Afro-Peruvian culture over making any substantive improvements to the material conditions of Afro-Peruvian communities.

Enter the census, which can play an important role in compelling the Peruvian government to address systemic inequality related to education, poverty, and health. Unfortunately, the last time Peru made a formal attempt to keep track of its African descended population via the census was in 1940.

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Watch Kuami Eugene's Vibrant Music Video "Meji Meji" Featuring Davido

This Ghanaian and Nigerian link up will make your day.

Ghana's Kuami Eugene has been an artist to watch—especially as he shows himself to hold his own on collab tracks.

The music video for his latest, "Meji Meji" featuring Davido, is here. Its upbeat vibe shines through as the two crooners go about their day in Ghana, singing sweet nothings to their love interests.

"Meji Meji" was produced by Fresh VDM, with the video directed by Twitch & Rex.

Take a look at the vibrant video below.

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