Style

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Inspired Dior’s Feminist Collection at Paris Fashion Week

Dior has a new Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie-inspired “We Should All Be Feminists” t-shirt.

Often, when you hear about “inspiration” at European and New York fashion weeks, it’s for some horribly misguided shit that went down. Remember last month when Marc Jacobs defended white models wearing dreadlocks at his NYFW show with this knee-jerk response?


Here’s some inspiration we can get behind.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has emerged as one of the stars of Paris Fashion Week. Why? The Nigerian novelist, writer and feminist icon is said to be the inspiration for Maria Grazia Chiuri’s ready-to-wear spring 2017 Dior collection and show. Chiuri, Dior's first female creative director in the fashion powerhouse's 70-year history, brought unabashed feminism to the runway on Friday.

"I strive to be attentive and open to the world and to create fashion that resembles the women of today," she said in her show notes, according to the Washington Post.

One design that stood out was a t-shirt with the words “WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS,” the name of the groundbreaking speech Adichie gave at a 2013 TedxEuston talk and subsequently developed into a book-length essay published in 2014. (Although there's still no word on how much one of these feminist couture tees will set you back.)

At one point, Chiuri had her models walk the runway to “Flawless,” Beyoncé’s girl-power anthem that famously featured excerpts from Adichie’s “We Should All Be Feminists.” And according to the Washington Post, excerpts from the speech echoed throughout the show's soundtrack.

Adichie watched on from the front row.

Interview
Stella Mwangi. Image courtesy of the artist.

Stella Mwangi: Hip-Hop Saved My Life as an African Growing Up in Norway

The Kenyan-Norwegian rapper speaks about the Hollywood hustle, the potential of East African music and what she's dropping next.

If it seems like Stella Mwangi is everywhere these days, that's understandable. It's nearly impossible to see all the rings she's throwing her hat into: her songs are getting featured in Hollywood and across commercials, films and movie trailers.

There's a reason why it's possible to stay on such a grind, to make it work after more than a decade in the rap game, and that's an underlying theme with much of what the Kenyan-Norwegian artist, who also goes by STL, does. She's charged with an incomprehensible current that would have burned out other artists. Even as I caught up with her, she was hours away from taking a flight to the filming of a reality cooking competitions in Norway.

So what is on deck for Stella Mwangi? As it turns out, seemingly everything.

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News

This South African DJ Is Creating a List of Toxic Men in the Industry She Won't Work With

DJ ANG is taking a stand against sexual harassment in the music industry by calling out toxic artists.

August is Women's Month in South Africa, and women around the country are using the opportunity to stand up against femicide, gender violence and sexual harassment on a national level.

There are many ways to protest, and South African DJ and head of SheSaidSo South Africa, Angela Weickl, also known as ANG is carrying out her own demonstration against sexual harassment in the music industry by calling toxic artists out by name and refusing to work alongside them.

"I will be including a list in every booking agreement from now onwards," the artist wrote on Facebook. "This list will be of artists who I refuse to be on a line up with due to their toxic and harmful behaviour. I will not share the spaces where we work to promote diversity, inclusion and safety, with people who harm and disrespect us. If a venue or promoter cannot understand my choice, then I choose not to associate with them."

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popular

Watch the Trailer for 'La Negrada'—Mexico's First Feature Film with an All-Black Cast

The beautifully-shot film snagged the cinematography award at the 2018 Guadalajara International Film Festival.

This August, OkayAfrica shines a light on the connections between Africa and the Latin-American world. Whether it's the music, politics or intellectual traditions, Africans have long been at the forefront of Latino culture, but they haven't always gotten the recognition. We explore the history of Afro-Latino identity and its connection to the motherland.

This new film that recently premiered in Mexico City has made history in the Latin American film world.

La Negrada, directed by Jorge Pérez Solano, is Mexico's first fiction film portraying the Afro-Mexican population, REMEZCLA reports.

Contributing to the slow, but long overdue recognition of Afro-Latino communities on the big screen, La Negrada tells the story of two women, Juana and Magdalena, who are both romantically involved with the same man, Neri. The film was shot throughout Costa Chica—a region that spans along the coast of Guerrero and Oaxaca that's home to the highest concentration of Afro-descendants in Mexico—as Solano enlisted locals and non-professional actors to star in the film.

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