Arts + Culture
Image via coraliecocorabadan's Instagram.

The 2018 DAK'ART Biennale Was a Creative Playground For African Artists

A look back at Senegal's biggest contemporary art gathering.

The dust has settled and Senegal has bid adieu to it's momentous 13th Dak'art Biennale. It proved to be the landmark event it's meant to be. From May 3rd to June 2nd, hundreds of works were shown and events took place in Dakar and surrounding areas.

The grandiose Ancien Palais de Justice stood at the center of the IN, like it did in 2016, with a number of paintings, photos, sculptures, videos and installations placed throughout its atriums and courtyards. IN artists' works called to mind a desire for unity, acceptance and home.

The OFF was the Biennale's playground, showcasing artists who didn't necessarily adhere to the Red Hour theme. Eclectic pieces were placed in hotels, restaurants, shops, by monuments, beaches, etc. The decentralization of art was awe-inspiring.

Keep reading... Show less
Art
'3 Nécessités Pour Une Émergence' by Abdoulaye Diallo. Photo courtesy of artist.

The Shepherd of Ngor Island Is the Senegalese Artist Fusing Numbers & Codes to Tell the World to Wake Up

We stopped by Abdoulaye Diallo's exhibition at the 2018 Dak'Art Biennale for a walkthrough of his work.

Abdoulaye Diallo, better known as Le Berger de L'ile de Ngor or "The Shepherd of Ngor Island," is an artist who has produced work in a notable red house on the Senegalese island since December 2011. A telecommunications engineer by trade, the retired 65 year old now finds solace in painting.

Normally to visit Diallo, you take a trip to his workshop, but this May he brought himself to others. For this year's Dak'Art Biennale, Diallo displayed his exhibition, Quelle humanité pour demain? (What Humanity for Tomorrow?) at Dakar University's Cheikh Anta Diop Library and has been viewed by over 4,300 guests. The setting was purposeful. Diallo chose to place his thought-provoking works in a place discernible for its furnishing of young minds.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Still from We Live in Silence (2017). Photo courtesy of Kudzanai Chiurai.

Kudzanai Chiurai's Mixed Media Series Challenges What It Means To Live in a Post-Colonial Society

The Zimbabwean contemporary artist recently showed his thought provoking exhibition, 'We Live in Silence' at this year's Dak'Art Biennale.

Kudzanai Chiurai is a Zimbabwean contemporary artist and activist who addresses issues as colonialism, corruption, xenophobia and democracy through his work.

Chiurai uses such mixed media as drawing, painting, videography and photography to tell his stories. His theatrical pieces reach widespread audiences across the world.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.