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Nelson Mandela’s Favorite African Folktales Are Coming Soon on Vinyl

Experience these timeless African folktales read by a star-studded cast featuring Don Cheadle, Whoopi Goldberg, Samuel L Jackson and more.

The audiobook, Nelson Mandela's Favorite African Folktales is coming out this September on vinyl from Wax Audio Group.

The audiobook features folktales that were hand-selected by Nelson Mandela from more than ten African countries in different regions. Stories include "The Lion the Hare and the Hyena" (Kenya), "The Wolf Queen" (South Africa), and "The Snake Chief" (Gabon), and "Mpipidi and the Motlopi Tree" (Botswana).

The book is directed by Alfre Woodard, and readers include Don Cheadle, Whoopi Goldberg, Samuel L Jackson, Alan Rickman, Hugh Jackman, LaTanya Richardson Jackson, Debra Messing, Parminder Nagra, Jurnee Smollett, Blair Underwood, Forest Whitaker. The book also features original music by Johnny Clegg and Vusi Mahlasela, and a special message from Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

"It is my wish that the voice of the storyteller may never die in Africa, that all the children of the world may experience the wonder of books," Mandela said in the original foreword to the folktales. The vinyl celebrates Mandela's legacy by engaging his favorite stories in new ways.

Find out more about the stories here. You can pre-order a copy here.

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Via Comedy Central

Watch Trevor Noah's Take Down of the French Ambassador's Letter That Said the World Cup Was Not an ‘African Victory’

The French ambassador tried to teach the late night host about the politics of inclusion. Noah hilariously exposes the hypocrisy.

It's not everyday that a European ambassador writes an angry letter in response to a late-night joke but these are strange and exceptional times.

When Trevor Noah congratulated the African team for winning the world cup on July 16 he got a stream of criticism back from French people, offended that French people of African descent are being called anything other than French. This included an official letter from the French ambassador to the United States. Noah's response: share the letter with the world, deconstruct the politics line by line, reflect on colonialism, and laugh at the temporary love for diversity that possesses politicians when they want to profit from people of color.

In part of the daily show's "Between the scenes" segment, Noah read the letter from the French ambassador to the United States Gérard Araud, who claimed that "nothing could be less true" than Trevor Noah's joke that the World Cup was an African Victory.

"Now first of all, I think I could have said they were Scandinavian. That would have been less true," he joked.


He went on to read Araud's definition of what it means to be French which included some obvious points like the fact that the players have citizenship, that most of them were born in the country, that they learned to play soccer in France and are that they are "proud of their country." The ambassador made sure he added France after every point so that there was no more confusion.

"The richness and various backgrounds of these players is a reflection of France's diversity," the ambassador concluded his remarks about French identity.

"Now I'm not trying to be an asshole but it is a reflection of France's colonialism," Noah clarified so that there wouldn't be any confusion about which France was being talked about.

Beyond the jokes, Trevor Noah and Araud attempted to tackle the racial politics that have haunted discussions around the World cup victory. Araud argued that talking about the Africanness of the French players "even in jest" legitimized the ideology of "whiteness as the only definition of being French." Using the United States as a scapegoat, he mentioned that France does not believe in hyphenated identities.

Noah pointed out what should be obvious, that there can be a multiplicity in identities. He also highlighted that perhaps this was not just a question of whether one can be African and French but the individual's intention in these discussions.

"When I say they are African. I'm not saying it to exclude them from their Frenchness. I am trying to include them in my Africanness. I am saying I see you my French brother of African descent," he concluded.

Watch the whole segment below:


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Screen shot from Kare11

4 Somali-American Teens Held at Gunpoint by Police Finally Get a Chance to Share their Story

Black Teens say that they were scared it would be their "last day of the world" after the police searched them at gunpoint.

Four Somali-America boys were able to tell their story today after a run in with police and racist assailants in Minneapolis last week that went viral. After being assaulted by a white teen hurling racial slurs and a trash can, the boys were held at gunpoint by the police after a 911 call described them as armed criminals.

All of the black teens are part of the city's large Somali community. Bystanders who were watching said the white aggressor had a trash can, a stick, and also claimed to have a knife. It was a young white woman who made the 911 call falsely accusing the boys of threatening her boyfriend and carrying a knife and a gun.

When police officers arrived at the scene, they searched the black teens at gunpoint before forcing them into the back of the police car. Facebook user Briana Lindell posted a viral video of the incidence and witnessed the teens being harrassed by the white teenager and being confronted by the police. Describing the scene she said,

"Two of the children were handcuffed and in front of the squad car. One was begging for his shirt on the ground because he was being bitten by mosquitos. My partner tossed him his shirt and a cop jumped out of the squad car and started yelling at us that we were interfering with an arrest. I asked the cop why he was arresting the kids as they'd done nothing wrong and he said they had received a call that the kids had a gun."



On Monday, the teens spoke about their experience when the Minnesota chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-MN) held a press conference.

Adam Guffe, an eighth grader, described the incidence. "I was at the park. I was just trying to have a good day with my friends." He added, "This white kid just came up to us saying racial slurs toward us. When the cops came, they just put guns to our faces. I felt like I was discriminated [against]. I felt like this was not supposed to happen. I hope it never happens to anyone again."

"They pulled a gun in my face, and I was scared," recalled 14-year-old Suhaib Ahmed. "One was shaking and I was scared that he was going to shoot me."

"I was scared. I thought that would be my last day of the world," 13-year-old Abdijabar Ahmed said.

While the boys had no physical injuries, the incidence has haunted them and their families. Sirat Guffe, the mother of one of the teens Adan, said through a translator, "They treated our children as if they were felons or thugs. Our children are not terrorists. They are not gangsters. They are not criminals. The way that this incident happened has really affected our family. We're still feeling depressed and sick from this incident."

According to Minneapolis Star Tribune, the park board have hired an outside party to investigate the incidence and to see if the park policies were followed by the police. This is one of many other incidences that highlight how easily institutional resources are used to harass black people.

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