Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust. Via Cohen Media Group.

Your June Guide to Streaming African Movies on Netflix

DIASPORA—Bored at home? Mindlessly flipping through the channels or scrolling down lists of movies in search of something to watch? Or maybe, you’re just trying to expand your movie horizons? Whatever the reason we got you!

Below you’ll find a list of noteworthy films and documentaries streaming on Netflix this month. You can revisit our 2016 ultimate guide to streaming African films on Netflix here, and check out our list from April of seven African documentaries to stream now.

Note: these titles are currently streaming on Netflix U.S. To find out if a film is streaming in your country, head here.


The Wedding Party

This Nigeria comedy by Kemi Adetiba follows the lives of a Nigerian couple played by Adesua Etomi and Banky W as they prepare for their upcoming wedding. If you’ve ever been privy to a wedding party, you know that it’s full of unexpected surprises and chaos. Read our interview with Banky W, here.


Hard to Get

This action-packed movie starring Pallance Dladla, Thishiwe Ziqubu, Israel Makoe, Paka Zwedala and Jerry Mofokeng, tells the story of TK, a womanizer from Jo’burg and Skiets the young thief he falls madly in love with.  Of the movie, director Zee Ntuli says “it explores the universal theme of love in the very specific context of contemporary South Africa. At its heart, it’s a story of two young South Africans embarking on the universal adventure of falling in love, set against the unpredictable backdrop of Joburg’s criminal underworld.”


Road to Yesterday

Directed by Ishaya Bako, and starring Genevieve Nnaji and Oris Erhuero, this Nigeria romantic drama tells the story of an estranged couple hoping to rekindle their relationship while on a road trip to a relative’s funeral. As they embark on their trips, memories and secret resurface, revealing that there might be more a stake than their relationship.


Gone Too Far

This British- Nigerian comedy directed by Destiny Ekaragha and starring  OC Ukeje, Adelayo Adaya, and Malachi Kirby, showcases the lives of two estranged brothers as they navigated their first- meeting. The younger of the two, Yemi, isn’t thrilled when his big brother moves in from Nigeria. Everything about Ikudayisi irks him, his fashion sense, his thick Yoruba accent, and his flirting techniques. When the two of them are forced to spend the day together, Yemi has to navigate his shame of his African heritage, confront local bullies, and impress the girl of his dreams.


Born to Win

This South African movie directed by Frans Cronjé is based on the true story of Leon Terblanche, a teacher at a school for disabled children. The movie follows his journey as he questions his faith and navigates through his despair— namely his painful childhood, his troubled temperament,  and his drinking.


Colors of Heaven

Set in apartheid South Africa, this biographic drama directed by Peter Beshai, tells the story of South African child-stars Muntu Ndebele and Norman Knox. From their meeting on the set of e’Lollipop to their fall out during the violent political struggles of the 1980s, to finally their reconciliation after Nelson Mandela‘s election in 1994.


Cold Harbour

This South African thriller by Carey Mckenzie, tells the story of Sizwe, a detective, whose dream is to join the South African Police Service. When a mutilated body is discovered along Cape Town’s shoreline, he goes on a quest to solve the case, confronting a series of obstacles along the way.


As I Open My Eyes

Leyla Bouzid‘s drama is set on the eve of the Jasmine Revolution in Tunisia.  The protagonist, Farah, a rebellious young woman joins a rock band to her family’s  dismay. Despite their disapproval, she’s determined to make a name for herself and continues singing even when the government attempts to silence her.


Daughters of the Dust 

This 1991 classic, is one of the newest additions to Netflix’s collection. The influential film, directed by Julie Dash, tells the story of a multi-generational family, trying to maintain their Yoruba cultural roots as they contemplate migration to the U.S. The film reappeared on the pop culture landscape last year thanks to Beyoncé‘s Lemonade. It is lauded for its nuanced and trailblazing portrayal of black women on film and it was the first feature film directed by a black woman distributed theatrically in the U.S.


Plot for Peace

This documentary directed by Carlos Agulló and Mandy Jacobson, highlights the key role a French businessman, Jean-Yves Ollivier, played in the discussion surrounding Nelson Mandela’s release. 


Where the Road Runs Out

This drama by Rudolf Buitendach, follows protagonist George’s—disillusioned university professor—journey as he returns to Equatorial Guinea, following the death of a friend. There he starts to see the possibility of a meaningful life.


Veve

This Kenyan drama by Simon Mukali follows Amos an ambitious member of parliament who gets caught in a narcotics trade as he seeks out another term in office.


Avenged

This South African action flick by Donovan Marsh tells the story of Chili Ngcobo, an undercover cop as he infiltrates a cash-in-transit heist gang. If you’re looking to indulge in an action-packed drama, this one’s for you.

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