News Brief

Forbes Africa on Their New 30 Under 30 Cover and Celebrating the Continent's Rising Stars

Forbes Africa just released the cover of the anticipated June issue featuring the new class of their "30 Under 30" list. Read our Q&A with the editor here.

JOHANNESBURG—On June 1, Forbes Africa dropped their much anticipated "30 Under 30" issue featuring the latest cohort of young African entrepreneurs working on building an African business. The African edition of Forbes Magazine—a publication localized for the African business—launched in 2011, becoming the 16th local edition of Forbes magazine with distribution in South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya.


In advance of the release, Forbes Africa released the cover for the "30 Under 30" list earlier this week. We caught up with Ancillar Mangena, the Forbes Africa journalist who leads the "30 Under 30" project and asked her more about the list and why it's important to celebrate young ambitious Africans.

Take a look at the cover and read our conversation with her below.

Photo courtesy of Forbes Africa.

OkayAfrica: Why do you think Forbes Africa's 30 Under 30 list is relevant right now?

Ancillar Mangena: This list celebrates young Africans who are working hard to turn the continent’s fortune. The list is released in June, which is South Africa’s Youth Month were we remember the youth of 1976 and their role in democracy. One would argue that while the youth of '76 fought for political freedom, these under 30s are fighting for financial freedom. As we like to call them, they are the billionaires of tomorrow.

OKA: Why do you think this list is important to the continent and the diaspora?

AM: Many a time we hear of Africa’s struggle, poverty, unemployment, crime and disease, this list shows how much Africa continues to evolve. They are not waiting or asking for handouts. These 30 are not waiting for anyone to offer them a job, they are creating the jobs and building global brands. The people featured are in diverse industries from manufacturing, import and export, fashion, beauty, agriculture, tech and many more.

OKA: What about this list is different or stands out from last year's list?

AM: This year we have more women compared to last year. It brings balance and features women breaking barriers.

OKA: As a journalist at a notable media house, how does it feel to be so instrumental in shining a light on the continent's rising stars?

AM: I call the under 30s my babies. That’s how personal the process is. I have spent months studying them, looking into their lives and business. We have been communicating back and forth and I have a lot of faith in their potential. Like a mother, I will always offer support where I can so that they can one day be on the cover of Forbes Africa magazine—meaning they will be worth more than $200 million. These are the bright shining stars in Africa. You may not know their names now but you will be forced to in a few years.

Meet the new class of Forbes Africa's 30 Under 30 below. Read more on these young, African trailblazers here.

Khethi Ngwenya, 26 (South Africa)

Founder, School Media

Iyinoluwa Aboyeji, 26 (Nigeria)

Founder, Flutterwave

Lulo Rubushe, 23 (South Africa)

Founder, RNDM Network

Thato Kgatlhanye, 24 (South Africa)

Founder, ‎Rethaka

Upendo Shuma, 28 (Tanzania)

Founder, Lavie Makeup Studio

Edikan Udiong, 29 (Nigeria)

Founder, Oleander House

Sibusiso Ngwenya, 25 (South Africa)

Founder, Skinny Sbu Socks

Jokate Mwegelo, 30 (Tanzania)

Founder, Kidoti Company

Allegro Dinkwanyane, 27 (South Africa)

Founder, Orgella Media

Jishan Ahmed, 30 (Zambia)

Founder, Arete Steel

Corbyn Munnik, 26 (South Africa)

Founder, Sliide

Mike Chilewe Jnr, 27 (Malawi)

Founder, Chilewe Brands

Knight Ganje, 29 (Zimbabwe)

Founder, H&G Advertising Group

Jean Bosco Nzeyimana, 24 (Rwanda)

Founder, Habona Ltd

Rupert Weterings, 28 (South Africa)

Founder, Allied Insurance Brokers

Eugene Mbugua, 26 (Kenya)

Founder, Young Rich Television Limited and My Yearbook Kenya

Limited

Sandra Mwiihangele, 29 (Namibia)

Founder, Kiyomisandz Beauty Products

Nasir Yammama, 27 (Nigeria)

Founder, Verdant Agri-Tech

Sean Drake, 29 (Ghana)

Founder, The Wealth Project Holdings

Shaleen Manhire Nullens, 29 (Zimbabwe)

Founder, Conquered Events

Shakeela Tolasade Williams, 29 (Nigeria)

Founder, Sade Hair

Zameer Verjee, 30 (Kenya)

Founder, Studio AZ

Harun Elias, 25 (Tanzania)

Founder, Javis International Trade Co.

Muktar Onifade, 26 (Nigeria)

Founder, VIZUVLGVDS

Elijah Lubala, 27 (DR Congo/South Africa)

Founder, Naserwa Real Estate

Mwayi Kampesi, 28 (Malawi)

Founder, In-House Interiors

Godfrey Magila, 25 (Tanzania)

Founder, Magilatech

Alloysius Attah, 27 (Ghana)

Founder, Farmeline

Jennifer Glodik, 29 (South Africa)

Founder, Diva Slimming and Aesthetics Centre

Rushil Vallabh, 29 (South Africa)

Founder, Secha Capital

This YouTube Account Is Sharing South African Audiobooks For Free, And We Are Here For It

Listen to audiobooks by Steve Biko, Bessie Head, Credo Mutwa, and more.

Audio Books Masters is a YouTube channel that uploads audio versions of South African books and short stories.

Recent additions include Life by Bessie Head, Crepuscule by Can Themba, Indaba, My Children by Credo Mutwa, among others. South African poet Keorapetse Kgositsile, who passed away three weeks ago, also gets read. You can listen to his poem No Serenity Here. More books you can stream include I Write What I Like by Steve Biko, Africa is my Witness by Credo Mutwa, among others.

Audio Book Masters was started by two friends, Bonolo Malevu (24) and Hahangwivhawe Liphadzi (23).

Malevu is a University of Pretoria BA Drama graduate, who is currently doing his LLB. Liphadzi is an LLB graduate, who is completing his LLM this year.

"I found a hobby of narrating books to craft my art skill after reading Credo Mutwa's Indaba, My Children," says Malevu in an email to OkayAfrica. "After reading the prologue, I knew that this book was meant to be converted [to] many different formats such as stage plays, series, movies and audiobooks."

Then came the idea of creating a YouTube channel. That was when Malevu teamed up with Liphadzi.

They both bought themselves high quality recorders, and started reading, recording and uploading.

Authors from the olden days such as RRR Dhlomo and HIE Dhlomo, whose audio versions of their books are available on the channel, are older than 50 years and their copyrights have since expired.

The rest, though, Liphadzi and Malevu say they are trying to get in contact with the publishers, but it's not easy.

"We have contacted the Department of Trade Industry (DTI) regarding this issue," they say. "We have been in contact with various copyright holders and we are still in the negotiation process. However we are finding it difficult to contact certain publishers, and the consistent uploading of their books is to attract their attention."

The two friends say they started the channel to bring books closer to people who otherwise wouldn't have access, and to get people to appreciate literature, especially African authors. "We want to bring such literature to the digital age in the form of storytelling which has been a unique African form of literature," they say. "The channel also helps develop our voices as we are a voice company that offers all kinds of voice services. We also identified how South African authors lack audio books, and found that there is a gap in this market, and this could really create many job opportunities in South Africa."

The two are currently developing stories in indigenous languages for children in English medium schools. "This is drawn from the fact that in such schools, a lot of African students struggle to speak their own native languages. So we approach various schools to sell them such literature. We are freelance voice over artists who also do radio, content production, news reading and radio adverts."

We are so here for this.

Subscribe to Audio Books Masters' YouTube channel and follow them on Twitter.

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Nigerian Actor Sope Aluko On How She Landed a Coveted Role in ​'Black Panther​'

Marvel's Black Panther is already on the brink of being a blockbuster, as it already broke box office records within the first 24 hours of it's pre-sale. Beating Captain America: Civil War's record in 2016, Fandango reports results from a user survey, stating Black Panther was 2018's second most-anticipated movie after Avengers: Infinity War.

One up-and-coming actor who will star alongside Lupita Nyong'o, Chadwick Boseman and Michael B. Jordan (to name a few) is Sope Aluko. Come February 16, we'll see the Nigerian-born actor play 'Shaman' in the film. Her previous credits include recurring roles on Netflix's “Bloodline," NBC shows “Law & Order SVU" and “Parks & Recreation" and guest appearances on USA Network's “Burn Notice" and Lifetime's “Army Wives."

Her film credits include supporting roles in feature films including Identity Thief, 96 Minutes, Grass Stains, The Good Lie and more. Raised in the UK, Aluko studied acting at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts (LAMDA) and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts (RADA). Aluko speaks four languages, including her native language, Yoruba, French, and Bahasa, an Indonesian language.

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Music

Femi Kuti Spreads Some Much-Needed Peace In the Video For 'One People One World'

Watch the music video for the first single off Femi Kuti's upcoming EP "One People One World."

Femi Kuti drops the music video for his single "One People One World," the title song from his forthcoming 10th studio album.

The energy boosting music video sees Femi Kuti delivering an electrifying performance in the Kuti family-owned New Afrika Shrine in Lagos.

On the track, the accomplished musician promotes an unwavering message of peace and unity—things that the world could perhaps always use more of, but especially so in today's Trump-dominated political climate. His message of positivity is illustrated with graphics that appear throughout the video, showing various country flags and symbols of love and peace.

"Racism has no place, give hatred no space," Kuti sings atop brassy instrumentals. "Let's settle the differences, it's best to live in peace. Exchange cultural experiences; that's the way it should be," he continues.

"One People One World," (the album) is a plea towards global harmony and solidarity. When you look at what's going on in Africa, Europe and America, it's important to keep the dream of unity alive," the artist told OkayAfrica in November.

"When I was a boy, I listened to funk, highlife, jazz, folk songs, classical music and my father's compositions, so you will hear those things in the music."

"One People, One World" by Femi Kuti and his band, the Positive Force, drops on February 23 via Knitting Factory, and is now available for preorder.

Femi Kuti, 'One People One World' cover.

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