Film

'Incorruptible' Documentary Looks Inside Artist-Led Youth Movement During Senegal's Tumultuous 2012 Election

'Incorruptible' is a new political documentary from director Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi focusing on Senegal's tumultuous 2012 elections.


Incorruptible is a new documentary feature from director Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi (Touba, Youssou N'dour: I Bring What I Love) that traces events surrounding Senegal's tumultuous 2012 elections. The 90-minute film goes behind the scenes of the Y'en A Marre movement, which formed in opposition to ex-president Abdoulaye Wade's attempts to remain in power for a third term. Led by Senegalese artists, activists and journalists, Y'en A Marre was particularly influential in garnering voter interest among the youth. The documentary follows the main players of the election period (in which 14 candidates ran for president), including the incumbent President Wade, opposition candidate Macky Sall, music superstar Youssou N'dour, and the Y’en a Marre movement.

The film, which debuted yesterday (June 9) at the Sheffield Doc/Fest in London, will be making its North American premiere on June 14th at the Los Angeles Film Festival. Watch the trailer, featuring an original new track from Akon, and see below for the film's official synopsis. Keep up with Incorruptible on Facebook and Twitter.

In a country where 70% of the population is under 30, the Y’en a Marre (Enough is Enough) movement caught fire. After 12 years of corruption and nepotism, of high food and gasoline prices, of constant power outages, and schools shuttered because of striking teachers, the constitutional crisis had become the last straw for the people of Senegal. 14 candidates ran for President.

Engaged with other youth movements around the world, Y’en a Marre learned hard lessons from the Arab Spring, and responded to the situation in Senegal by calling for the restoration of accountable representative democracy. Senegal’s rich cultural tradition fed a movement – led by these artist activists to register over 300,000 new voters, and rally people to the polls. More people voted in this election than ever before in the history of an independent Senegal.

Macky Sall, the candidate who ran on a platform of reform and anti-corruption, won.  Y’en a Marre now wrestles with how to hold the newly elected President to his campaign promises. The film explores this transition and the question: after you unite against something, what do you then unite for? In a time where democracy is under siege in many parts of the world, Incorruptible offers a positive, hopeful example while at the same time honestly examining the sustainability of a peoples’ movement, and the role that youth are taking in shaping the future of their own country.

Wizkid at Gidi Fest 2018. Photo: Tej/Gidi Culture Festival.

The Significance Of Wizkid's Failure To Perform At Coachella

And what consequences this could have for future Nigerian and African music shows abroad.

Nigeria's Wizkid didn't perform at the 2018 edition of the Coachella Valley and Arts Festival. While leading musicians across genres from all parts of the world climbed the stages over two weekends to provide concert-goers a live experience of their art, Starboy was absent. He was booked, his name was announced in the line-up, and two slots, over two weekends were allocated for his set. But he missed his placement due to "his inability to get US visas" for his band members.

Wizkid didn't just miss this chance. Africa did. Due to the significance of the his set at such a global stage, the Afrobeats movement did. Everyone, from creators, through the facilitators of the art, down to the consumers, everyone missed out on a crucial chance to bring our music to a diverse audience, at arguably the biggest music festival in the world. The timing was right. Wizkid, due to strength of his art, and the efficacy of his deals, found himself as the anointed one from Africa to do that.

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The IAAF Says Caster Semenya Must Lower Her Testosterone Levels Or Compete in Longer Distances

A new controversial set of rules will affect Caster Semenya severely.

South African middle-distance athlete Caster Semenya might be forced to compete in longer distance dashes.

This comes after the International Association of Athletics Federation announced that this Thursday it will reveal new rules for athletes with hyperandrogenism (high levels of testosterone in the female body). The rules, according to a report by the Daily MailDaily Mail, will force Semenya to either take medication to reduce her naturally occurring testosterone levels or move to longer-distance events.

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Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

11 South African Hip-Hop Songs About Weed

4/20 Special: Here are 11 South African songs to get high to.

You can't separate hip-hop and weed. Dr. Dre's debut album The Chronic was named after the herb and the likes of Snoop Dogg, Wiz Khalifa and Quasimoto pretty much made careers off rapping about weed.

The tradition is alive wherever hip-hop exists. In South Africa, weed has been rapped about just as much as the aforementioned artists have. And according to Lord Quas on "America's Most Blunted" from the album Madvillainy, listening to music under the influence of weed makes it sound better.

"Listening to music while stoned is a whole new world. Most cannabis consumers report it second only to sex. And grass will change your musical habits, for the better."

In light of 4/20, we list some South African hip-hop songs, both old and new, about weed. If you're a smoker, these songs could come in handy for you today.

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