Lupita Nyong'o Tells Grazia UK, "Don't Touch My Hair"

The actress took to social media to call out Grazia UK for photoshopping her natural hair in the November edition.

Lupita Nyong'o called out Grazia UK on Instagram for photoshopping her natural hair on the cover and spread of the November issue.


She states:

"As I have made clear so often in the past with every fiber of my being, I embrace my natural heritage and despite having grown up thinking light skin and straight, silky hair were the standards of beauty, I now know that my dark skin and kinky, coily hair are beautiful too. Being featured on the cover of a magazine fulfills me as it is an opportunity to show other dark, kinky-haired people, and particularly our children, that they are beautiful just the way they are. I am disappointed that @graziauk invited me to be on their cover and then edited out and smoothed my hair to fit their notion of what beautiful hair looks like. Had I been consulted, I would have explained that I cannot support or condone the omission of what is my native heritage with the intention that they appreciate that there is still a very long way to go to combat the unconscious prejudice against black women's complexion, hair style and texture. #dtmh"

The magazine responded with an apology, saying they did not make such request.

This mixup calls to mind Solange's clap back to Evening Standard Magazine just last month. The magazine photoshopped her hair sculpture by artist and hairstylist Joanne Petit-Frére's off of her cover, and the singer took to Instagram to display the original look.

These apologies are necessary, yet fleeting—as the damage has already been done. While we hope these mainstream entities now know to do better in the future, these incidents are more examples of why more black people need a seat at the table.

African Athletes Break Barriers at 2018 Winter Olympics

They did it for the culture.

The 2018 Winter Olympics have undoubtedly been a monumental one for African athletes.

Several national teams from across the continent made their triumphant Olympic debuts, challenging years upon years of white domination at the games. These athletes hail from Eritrea, Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, South Africa and more.

These athletes had won the games, even before any medals were awarded, solely based on the fact that their achievements have broken ground for future athletes from the continent.

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You Need to Hear Odie's Industrial Afrobeats Sound In 'Faith'

The 21-year-old producer & singer has been channeling his Nigerian roots into next level fusions.

After jumping back into the scene with the smooth alternative R&B; track "Little Lies" a couple of weeks ago, Odie is back at it with a more up-tempo sound this time around.

"Faith" is the infectious new single off the producer-cum-singer's upcoming project, Analogue, which is due in the spring.

The Toronto-born, Bay Area-raised artist lets his Nigerian roots come alive with the song which incorporates both industrial sounds and afrobeats. The 21-year-old talent has previously stated that he is influenced by the likes of Kid Cudi, Chris Martin, and Fela Kuti. It's not hard to spot how seamlessly he is blending these varied styles in his music.

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This Zambian Filmmaker Won a BAFTA for Her Debut Film 'I Am Not a Witch"

The filmmaker say her win "was a real big shock."

"I Am Not a Witch," a Zambian film about a nine-year-old girl, played by Maggie Mulubwa, sentenced to exile at a witch camp, earned the award for Outstanding debut at the 2018 BAFTA's.

Zambian-born filmmaker, Rungano Nyoni, who moved to wales at the age of 9, expressed genuine shock over the win. "I was waiting for my category to go so I could go to the toilet," said Nyoni afterwards. "It was a real big shock."

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