Music
Di'Ja.

The Best Nigerian Songs of the Month

Here are the best Nigerian tracks to come out this month.

The close of 2017 saw the release of very impressive projects, most of which were singles and EPs.


Notable exceptions from our list below include Juls' "Ojekoo," DJ Consequence's "Vibes The Mixtape" and Melvitto's "Soon" EP. A wild card inclusion which didn't make the final list is Sarkodie's commanding take on Olamide's "Wo!!"

Read on for the best Nigerian songs of December 2017.

"Shaku Shaku" - Dammy Krane

In a exclusive interview and his first since being absolved of credit fraud charges in the US, Dammy Krane spoke to OkayAfrica about his nightmare experience and new resolve to focus on his talents for music by recording and releasing song after song. Three were published in December alone: the defiant "Credit Card Moves," the Fela-lite "Wonder," and the impressive "Shaku Skaku". [Read the full interview here]

"Jacurb" - MC Galaxy

MC Galaxy continues the slow build of South Africa's gqom wave in Nigeria.

"Replay" - Ice Prince

How boring would rap be today if rappers didn't sing to multiply the textures on such a word-heavy genre?

"No Do" - Kiss Daniel

If only every life advice was sung in such a seductive rasp…

"Ezugo" & "Needy" - Badbridge LOS

It is no exaggeration to say that over half of the 12 songs that make up Badbridge's "Regular Trademark" EP could have made this list so the choice of two is as objective as it is an editorial constrained.

"Your Father" - MI feat Dice Ailes

How rude! (Unless deserved). Diles Ailes weaves simple and smart wordplays in what might be Step 1 of Rude Jude's program to reinvigorate Nigerian rappers after the riot act asking them to fix up their lives.

"Kpro Kpro" - Sean Tizzle

Both Tizzle and Jersey made one of 2017's most well crafted (but little praised) EPs in "Moving Forward," continuing this rich seam of collaboration on "Kpro Kpro."

"I Am North" - Kheengz

Part corrective, part riot act, part apology, part big fuck you to the shamefully narrow perceptions of northern Nigeria (still) held by many Nigerians, "I Am Not" is also the stand out song on Kheengz "Pedestal" EP on which he frequently blends Hausa and Trap to engaging results.

"Only One" - Tekno

If you have a good riff, stick to it and Mr Slow Charmer is in no rush to ramp up the tempo.

"So Rire" - Simi & Legendury Beatz

If you recall that Legendury Beatz are the brains behind Wizkid's "Ojuelegba," "Caro" and "Ginger," the brilliance of their debut album Afropop 101 will not surprise you. Taken from the album, "So Rire" is a clever reworking of IK Dairo's original by Simi who continues to rework juju classics to satisfying results, after the delight that is "Joromi," originally by Sir Victor Uwaifo. [Read the full review here]

"Turkey Nla" - Wande Coal

Mr Amazing Voice has known what to do with a big body busy beat ever since 2013's "Rotate."

"My Lover" & "Save Me" - Di'Ja

The most satisfying two of the seven songs that make up her long-gestated "Aphrodija" EP.

"BIA" - Seyi Shay

Seyi Shay continues to refine the genre blend she started on the still impressive "Yolo Yolo."

"Sekkle Down" - Burna Boy

Both Burna Boy and J Hus retrace the melodic goodness both found on "Good Time" off "Common Sense" and one of our 20 best grime releases of 2017.

"Pereke" - Teni

A clever reworking of highlife and galala, and a winning follow-up to the breakout hit that is "Fargin."

"Correct G" - Ayo Jay feat. Davido and Olamide

Hard to doubt the title when the features are certified heavyweights.

"Candy" & "Spell" - Lady Donli feat. Tay Iwar

A most divine song from the sure-footed EP that is "Letters To Her."

"Aika" - Nonso Amadi

A sweet voice and mild manners masks a tangled psyche—"I'll keep any pact in mind, I'm good at acting fine / I'll take shifts with your man, but I can't keep track of time"—in yet another song that showcases Amadi's songwriting and production talent.

"Werey Yo" - CDQ

CDQ's growl is a good fit for Masterkraft's electro-house confection.

"Usual" - Melvitto feat Nonso Amadi

The most song assured of the 5 songs that make up the delicate assembly that is Melvitto's "Soon" EP.

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Via CONIFA

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Photo by Farah Sosa.

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