Arts + Culture
Photo courtesy of PULSE Art Fair.

4 Black Artists You Need To See at PULSE Miami Beach 2017

PULSE Miami Beach returns for its 13th edition this weekend, and these are the black artists you can't miss.

PULSE Miami Beach, a fair that dedicates itself to all things contemporary art, goes down at Indian Beach Park this Thursday, December 7 through Sunday, December 10.

This will be the 13th edition for the fair and marks the debut of their new director, Katelijne De Backer. Under her leadership PULSE will welcome its vibrant audience to over 70 galleries from five continents and will introduce 15 first time exhibitors at the fair.

The fair's oceanfront location is the perfect backdrop for a multi-faceted and engaging experience with a range of works from international artists.

You can find the complete rundown of who will be showing art at PULSE Miami Beach here, and read up on the four black artists you need to see at the fair below.


1. Tony Gum

Tony Gum, Xhosa Woman - Umfazi, 2017. Courtesy of Christopher Moller Gallery.

Tony Gum, represented by Christopher Moller Gallery (the only gallery representing the continent) will show her latest work, 'Ode to She', in her solo exhibition at PULSE. It encapsulates the essence of what it means to be a Xhosa woman, a human expression of 'womanhood'. To create the images, Gum went on a pilgrimage to the Eastern Cape —her ancestral homeland—where she learned about the rituals of womanhood in Xhosa culture.

"I believe in honoring our individual truths," she says in a press release. "Our ability to pause, reflect, connect and celebrate that which makes each of us whole means we are better placed to recognize and respect this essence in others."

Read more about 'Ode to She' in our Q&A with Gum here.

2. Devan Shimoyama

Crowned, 2017. Oil, color pencil, jewelry, sequins, collage, acrylic and feathers on canvas. Courtesy of Samuel Freeman Gallery.

Devan Shimoyama is an African- American artist being presented by Samuel Freeman Gallery.

The multi-media works being featured in his solo presentation strikes deeper into the language of mythology and stereotype. Shimoyama works to entices the viewer into mythical landscapes and nighttime jungles.

"In these paintings, I use the language of classical mythology, folklore and contemporary stereotype to illuminate a small fraction of what it means to be a Young Black Gay Man in search of his own identity," Shimoyama says in a press release. "In these works, the Black Male Figure becomes an archetypal shamanistic character navigating from painting to painting, sharing with the viewer tiny moments of magic."

3. Devin N. Morris

Devin N. Morris, Untitled Red (sam 04), 2016. Digital c-print. Courtesy of Jenkins Johnson Gallery.

Devin N. Morris was recently named one of the "12 African American Photographers to Watch" by Time magazine. In his monochrome photograph series, '11 Conveniences,' he created an environment with fabrics, domestic furnishings and figures. He is currently exhibiting in 'We the People' at the Minnesota Museum of American Art, and previously shown in Queering Space, the first queer show at the Yale School of Art.

"Subjects and objects are arranged in a way that reads as an assemblage, as I am often trying to readdress the many assembled parts of the disparate African American history," Morris says in a release.

4. Nnenna Okore

Nnenna Okore, Okochi, 2017. Burlap, dye and wire. Courtesy of Jenkins Johnson Gallery.

Nnenna Okore is a Nigerian artist, a former intern of El Anatsui and recent Fulbright Fellow. She creates organic and twisted structures that mimic the intricacies of the fabric, trees, bark, and topography familiar from her childhood in Nigeria.

In her newest works, Okore aspires "to represent through the use of visual metaphor, and vibrant elements the potency and ephemerality of life and its natural cycles."

For more on PULSE Miami Beach 2017 check out their website and follow them on Twitter and Instagram.

popular

Black Twitter's Reactions to the Royal Wedding are Priceless

"When you're about to throw some seasoning on the proceedings."

The Royal Wedding happened this morning at St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle in England, where Prince Harry and Meghan Markle solidified their union with a grand ceremony surrounded by friends, family and loved ones.

Around 600 guests were in attendance for the affair, including Oprah Winfrey, Idris Elba and Serena Williams just to name a few.

Markle is now the first melanin-possessing person to become part of the British royal family, as her official title is now Duchess of Sussex.

The entire event was streamed live on Twitter, and of course the internet had quite a lot to say about it.

Folks have been sharing their commentary all morning, with many on Twitter highlighting some of the ceremony's "blackest" moments, and sharing funny quips about pretending not to care about the wedding, but watching anyway.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Image courtesy of Jo Griffin

This Tanzanian Girls' Football Team Came Second in Moscow but Feel Triumphant

Meet the highflying Tanzanian girls' football team, stars of this week's Street Child World Cup.

With a huge smile and surrounded by some of her new friends from 20 different countries at the Sapsan Arena in Moscow, Asteria Robert, the 14-year-old captain of the Tanzanian girls' football team, takes in the atmosphere following the final of the Street Child World Cup.

"When we left we couldn't believe we could reach this level and we're so glad we got this far in the tournament," says Asteria, after leading her team on to the podium to receive medals and a trophy for coming in second place.

The Street Child World Cup is a football tournament for children all over the world who have experienced homelessness or are considered at risk of living on the streets. It takes place before the FIFA World Cup.

After a high-octane performance with many chances at goal, the Tanzanian girls were defeated 1-0 by a team from Rio de Janeiro at the stadium—a stone's throw from Lokomotiv, home of the newly-crowned Russian Premier League champions. Some of the girls slumped on the floor at the final whistle but soon gathered themselves to show sportsmanship and congratulate the winners from Brazil

The final game was live-streamed by Goal and seen by more than 130,000 people. In the stadium the team were cheered on by teenagers from across the world, banging drums and waving the Tanzanian flag.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Supplied.

Swaziland’s Rendition Croons About Love & The Hustle On His Debut EP ‘Art.Love.Magic’

Listen to Rendition's debut EP.

Rendition is a producer from Swaziland, whose debut EP we are premiering here. Rendition has produced for a handful of artists such as uSanele, Una Rams, Just Robyn, 80 Script, among others.

On the EP, which is titled Art. Love. Magic, and was recorded at Red Bull Studios in Cape Town, Rendition croons about relationships ("On My Way," "Need Some More," "Crazy Love") and the hustle ("Overtime"), with the aid of autotune.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.