Style

Top 10 African Menswear Bloggers You Need To Follow On Instagram

These stylish African men teach us a thing or two on their beautifully curated Instagram pages—check out who they are here.

African style bloggers have gained large followings lately—but the internet has continued to see stylish African men doing their thing online and taking the blogging world by storm.

These men are taking risks, transforming industry stereotypes and probably influencing your celebrity crushes closet (Oh heyyy, Kofi Siriboe!).

Below you’ll find clean looks, trendy patterns and mix of street style and traditional influences. Ladies sit back and enjoy the view. Fellas, take notes.

In no particular order, meet our favorite African men’s style bloggers of 2017 below.

1. Denola Grey

A post shared by Denola Grey (@denolagrey) on

Denola Grey is a men’s fashion blogger, model and media personality from Nigeria. His style and passion to be comfortable in what you wear and how you wear it is impeccable. The layout of his blogs clean, white and tasteful theme gives you a little hint of his unforgettable style. Visit his website to follow his journey.

2. Noble Igwe

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Noble Igwe is a Nigerian blogger and founder of 360nobs Group, an online magazine focused on news, entertainment, fashion and lifestyle. His mogul ventures have named him as one of Nigeria’s well-known creative entrepreneurs. Igwe’s successful brand is one to stay woke with; make sure to visit his website to keep up with this creative powerhouse.

3. Lourens Gebhardt

Lourens Gebhardt is a Namibian blogger on tumblr and menswear influencer that describes himself as the epitome of everything vintage. Lourens illustrates grown man sexy with his sophisticated, clean cut, dapper, vintage suits on regular basis – no seriously this man is never dressed down! Follow this dandy man’s blog on Tumblr to get daily inspiration.

4. Laduma Ngxokolo

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Laduma Ngxokolo is a textile and knitwear designer and blogger from Port Elizabeth, South Africa. His passion for knitwear bred from the yearning to celebrate traditional Xhosa beadwork for men. He has a true desire to spread his love for his South African culture through clothing and to express his experiences he has learned through his travels in his designs. Check out how Laduma uses a piece of home to exude his Xhosa heritage to others by visiting his website.

5. Mohcine Aoki Harris

Mohcine Aoki Harris is a Moroccan blogger, model and photographer. Mochine’s street style with a bit of everyday chic is the perfect demonstration a young men transitioning to a grown man. He has a clear grasp of when, where and how to convey a certain look. Follow his blog here.

6. Franklin Saiyalel

Franklin Saiyalel is a male fashion blogger from Kenya. He uses his blog to advice his viewers on trends and an outlet to share thoughts and ideas on his passion with brand experiences, fashion and footwear. His style, vision, and helpful tips for his followers speak volumes about his influence to others. Make sure to stay tuned for all his adventures by following his site here.

7. Allen A. Coleman

Allen Coleman is a Ghanaian menswear blogger and street style/product photographer. He uses his blog to celebrate different forms of street style and his minimalist sense of style. In the bio of Allen’s website he says, “www.ByAllencoleman.com is simply a doorway into the journey of man who is infatuated with the beauty of his world.” Do yourself a favor and check out his beauty of art through his lenses and the way he sees himself in that world.

8. Trevor Stuurman

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Trevor Stuurman is a South African blogger, multimedia visual artist and a DAMN good dresser. He has an flawless eye for dressing well with his sharp Afrocentric sets, hats and constant culture appreciation. Did I mention his camera skills are breathtaking? Check Trevor's blog out on Tumblr for more.

9. Steven Onoja

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Steven Onoja is a Nigerian blogger that provides men with an urban perspective and effortless style to look up to. He collaborates with a number of international and iconic brands such as Nike, Levis and many others. For daily motivation, visit his website to see this smooth, crisp, creative and oh so fly individual climb to the top as one of Africa’s best.

10. Igee Okafor

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Igee Okafor uses is lifestyle blog to learn and create conversation about the growth and culture for menswear. He uses is travel experiences from Paris, Spain, Virginia and his Nigerian culture to navigate is fashion sense. With his witty smile, vibrant colors, and effortlessly fresh approach he is sure to add to the list as one of the best to follow—check out his blog here.

This New Musical Explores the Life of 'Fela Kuti and the Kalakuta Queens'

"Nobody ever talks about the 27 wives."

A new musical by Nigerian arts mogul, Bolanle Austen-Peters dives into the life of Fela Kuti and his relationship with the Kalakuta Queens—the 27 women he married in a single ceremony in 1978.

In a new video from the BBC, Austen-Peters give us a look into the production process, and tells us more about why she wanted to focus on the story of the Kalakuta Queens, who also acted as dancers for the musician, in particular.

"It just occurred to me that nobody ever talked about the 27 wives that he had. And I wondered who they were? I wanted to understand what informed their decision to marry one man, and what drove them. You know, what was their passion?" Watch the full video below.

Fela Kuti and the Kalakuta Queens is currently showing at the renovated Terra Culture Arena in Lagos, which Austen-Peters founded back in 2003.

We spoke to Austen-Peters back in August about her mission to promote Nigeria's arts and culture scene and about producing the West End's first Nigerian musical, Wakaa!. Revisit our interview with her here.

Fela and the Kalakuta Queens deserve all the shine!

Maleek Berry's Bob Marley Cover on BBC Radio 1Xtra Is Everything

His rendition of "Turn Your Lights Down Low" will smooth out your day.

Maleek Berry's newest cover is surely going to help get you through hump day.

The crooner and producer performed a wavy rendition of Bob Marley's "Turn Your Lights Down Low" on BBC Radio 1Xtra, a solid week after he dropped his highly anticipated EP, First Daze Of Winter.

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Illustration by Nathi Ngubane.

The Humorous Politics of South African Funerals

South African funeral etiquette is uh—unique.

There is perhaps nothing more tragic than death as much as it is the one constant of life itself. Funerals are sombre events meant to mourn the passing of a loved one and understandably so. In spite of this, I have ironically experienced tremendous humour at black South African funerals especially and I know many black Africans will be able to relate. For those of you who are curious to know what happens exactly at these funerals, keep reading.

Can I also get some of that beef stew?

Illustration by Nathi Ngubane

Black South Africans go to funerals for pretty much the same reason they go to weddings: for the food. If there is a long queue at a funeral (reminiscent to the one you'll find on election day), you can best believe it's for food. You will often hear: "That's not enough chicken, dear" and "I'm taking a plate for Albertina as well" (they're really not). Oh, and did I mention that people always make sure to bring their own lunch boxes to take away food when they go?

That Merc over there? Yeah, I just got it yesterday.

Illustration by Nathi Ngubane

Black South Africans are particularly fond of ensuring that everyone at the funeral sees or at least hears about their latest material acquisitions, be it a new car, the R5000 wristwatch they're wearing or the house they just bought. It's terribly funny to hear how people will go from "You know he was such a great guy, what a loss" to "You know I remember how he helped me pick out my new Merc. It's parked over there." I suppose what better way to show off how well you're doing than at a funeral right?

The professional mourners and the art of being extra

Illustration by Nathi Ngubane

At funerals, there are always those whose mourning fast becomes somewhat of a theatrical performance. 'Can you see me?' they seem to be asking as they roll wildly on the floor, tear at their clothes and fall over the feet of others. Ironically, it's almost always those who are the least related to the deceased. When this happens (and it almost always does), you're never quite sure whether to continue grieving the deceased or to attend to them instead.

I didn't see you at the last funeral though

Illustration by Nathi Ngubane

Black South Africans go to many funerals. Be it a close relative or the friend of the mother of a cousin twice removed—black people are there. And so if you're met with a cold shoulder from relatives you haven't seen in a while, they're probably angry at you for not attending one of those funerals. What's worse, unless you yourself were close to death, no excuse is deemed valid. This is when you smile and politely excuse yourself to go and grab some food.

This is the sister to that other aunt from your father's side

Illustration by Nathi Ngubane

Funerals are large events and so because you can't possibly know everyone, from those coming from the suburbs to those coming from the village, it's always safest to assume that everyone is a relative of some sort. You will meet an aunt you last saw when you were in diapers and be expected to not only remember who she is but where exactly she fits into the family tree. Again, this would be a great time to go and grab some more food.

Black people don't leave wills, they leave bills

Illustration by Nathi Ngubane

Chris Rock was right on the money when he said the above. It is commonplace to see those whom the deceased owed money unashamedly attend the funeral. In fact, they are often the ones who demand to be served the most food (see how it's always about the food?) and pretty much anything else for that matter. I'm sure many would even repossess the deceased's casket if they could.

We had a great time at the funeral

Illustration by Nathi Ngubane

"How did the funeral go?" South Africans will ask this question and unfailingly so. Amusingly, they will ask it in the way they would ask how a trip to the mall or a holiday to another country went. They want specific details. I'm never quite sure what to say. Do I comment on the style of the casket, whether the food was cooked well or if there was any drama? I mean we just buried a person so on a scale of one to ten, I'd say it wasn't too great hey – but that's just me.

Anytime is drinking time

Illustration by Nathi Ngubane

So what do South Africans do after the funeral is over and done with? They open up the bottles of alcohol of course. We've even come up with a legitimate term for it , the 'after tears'. After the last tear has fallen, the first sips of alcohol begin. And so when you see the once dignified uncle stumbling about, it's really not the grief overwhelming him; it's probably just the whiskey.

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