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Ta-Nehisi Coates to Colbert: I Have No Hope For America

Colbert asked Coates if he had any hope for America being a better country and having better race relations. Coates said "No."

Ta-Nehisi Coates stopped by The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to talk about his upcoming book We Were Eight Years in Power.

The two started out talking about Colin Kaepernick and the recent NFL kneeling protests, which Coates thinks have been "very successful."


The topic then turned to protests, civil rights, Black Lives Matter, and Martin Luther King Jr, with Coates mentioning, "It's very similar to how people feel about NFL protests today, 60 percent of Americans disapproved of Martin Luther King specifically as a person. He didn't get killed out of nowhere."

Talk then unavoidably steered towards Trump and a notable moment came about when Colbert asked Coates if he had any hope for America being a better country and having better race relations.

This topic, by the way, is addressed by Coates several times in We Were Eight Years in Power. Throughout the book he mentions that he "hates being asked to offer white people hope of a better future in which America might become a post-racial utopia," as Vox puts it.

Coates answer to Colbert:

"No."

Photo by Nii Kotei Nikoi.

These Ghanaian Women Artists Publicly Chart Paths to Healing from Sexual Violence

Mixtape Notes To The Shadows is a collaborative mixed media exhibition that uses art to show the complex process of healing.

How do you trap a shadow? How do you hold onto to something that slips out of your hands and appears when you step into the light? In Ghanaian society, which is predominantly patriarchal, issues like sexual violence and harassment are treated as shadows, suppressed and left to brood in the dark, unspoken and unaddressed. Despite the undocumented number of people who are tormented by these shadows, it's hard to confront something that society does not believe exists in the way that you experience it.

Dr. Sionne Rameah Neely and Josephine Ngminvielu Kuuire, who are artists and survivors of sexual violence, decided to draw out these demons and shadows by leaving notes for them through art. Mixtape Notes To The Shadows, their collaborative mixed media exhibition and performance, was an open surgery on sexual trauma inviting witnesses as they chart their respective journeys to healing.

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Music

This Documentary Takes You Inside South Africa’s Biggest Trap Movement, ATM

Watch the Emtee-directed and produced documentary about ATM.

South African rapper and singer Emtee and his producer Ruff started a movement when they released "Roll Up" in 2015.

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Music

EL’s ‘BAR 4’ Is One of the Strongest African Hip-Hop Releases of the Year

Ghanaian rapper EL declares himself the best African rapper for the fourth time, and we are tempted to believe him.

Prolific Ghanaian rapper El's Bar mixtape series is on its fourth iteration in just three years.

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