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Photo Courtesy of Uzo Aduba

100 Women: Uzo Aduba Wants to Use Her Roles to Give a Voice to the Voiceless

We talk to the Emmy-winning standout of Orange is the New Black on how to be good, just as you are.

As a child Uzoamaka Aduba was insecure about a great many things. Her name and the now-famous gap in her teeth were among the number. "My mom would try to impress upon me constantly, 'Don't you know that in Nigeria, a gap is a sign of beauty? It's a sign of intelligence.' I'm like, 'We don't live in Nigeria, mom. We live in Medfield, Massachusetts.'" Thirty-seven-year-old Aduba is quite the opposite—dramatically, if you will. Currently chatting from a mountainside village in Mendoza, Argentina, she exudes total self-possession, and is crystal clear on not just her beauty and her talent, but on what she stands for ("Equality for all. Full stop.") and even her privilege.

"Whatever I think is hard is nowhere near what hard is. First solid lesson. Anything that I considered to be difficult, I don't have to reach that far back into my history and to my community stories to know what hard really looked like," the Nigerian-American actress states in a definitive tone. "Hard is moving to a country where you know no one and have five children. Hard is surviving a civil war. Hard is surviving polio. Hard is learning how to blend into a new culture without losing your own. You understand? Me figuring out which of the seven pairs of jeans I want to wear today is not hard."

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100 Women: Gelila Bekele Is the Ethiopian Activist Building Solutions to Help Her Community Thrive

The Ethiopian model and activist wants to make sure that "Africa isn't a dumping ground for foreign aid"—here's how she's doing it.

Gelila Bekele, is an Ethiopian model, activist, filmmaker and self-proclaimed "village girl" who is fiercely advocating for the people of her community.

Bekele is dedicated to fostering growth and long-term sustainability in Ethiopia's rural areas—places where she proudly calls home. For her, it's all about supporting her local community and addressing the barriers that young people face to receiving education, clean water and more. "It all starts from your home," says Bekele."

When it comes to seeing her community thrive, Bekele believes that It's all about intention and follow through. One of her primary goals is to "make sure Africa isn't a dumping ground for foreign aid, and really making sure that we are apart of the conversation in every level."

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100 Women: Kay Oyegun and Angelica Nwandu on The Power In Our Words

The founder of the Shade Room, Angelica Nwandu and filmmaker and TV writer, Kay Oyegun discuss staying true to their points of view, and the power in being allowed to fail.

In out latest video, Nigerian media guru and founder of The Shade Room Angelica Nwandu and Kay Oyegun, a Nigerian-Beninese writer and filmmaker, who writes for NBC's This Is Us and OWN's Queen Sugar, sit down for a frank conversation on the power of words and emotional connections, and how we can channel both into action.

"When you can make somebody feel something, you have their attention, and once you have their attention you can persuade them to want to change the world," says Nwandu.

The two share some of their experiences in their respective industries, opening up about how they've dealt with backlash, as well as the pressure put on black creatives to always be at the very top of their game.

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