Photo by Nii Kotei Nikoi.

These Ghanaian Women Artists Publicly Chart Paths to Healing from Sexual Violence

Mixtape Notes To The Shadows is a collaborative mixed media exhibition that uses art to show the complex process of healing.

How do you trap a shadow? How do you hold onto to something that slips out of your hands and appears when you step into the light? In Ghanaian society, which is predominantly patriarchal, issues like sexual violence and harassment are treated as shadows, suppressed and left to brood in the dark, unspoken and unaddressed. Despite the undocumented number of people who are tormented by these shadows, it's hard to confront something that society does not believe exists in the way that you experience it.

Dr. Sionne Rameah Neely and Josephine Ngminvielu Kuuire, who are artists and survivors of sexual violence, decided to draw out these demons and shadows by leaving notes for them through art. Mixtape Notes To The Shadows, their collaborative mixed media exhibition and performance, was an open surgery on sexual trauma inviting witnesses as they chart their respective journeys to healing.

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From Ernest Dükü's 'Black Series.' Courtesy of Sitor Senghor.

Ernest Dükü's 'Black Series' Is an Exploration of African Spiritual Symbols

We caught up with the Ivorian veteran artist for an in-depth conversation around his new artworks.

Ernest Dükü walks gently into the courtyard of London's Somerset House. With his greying hair spiking from his head and wearing the uniform of the fashionably ragged scholar—black suit-jacket and a scarf—he could be confused for a visitor to the 1.54 Contemporary African Art Fair. But Dükü, is an acclaimed Ivorian artist, here for the first UK showing of his new works titled "Black Series."

The 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair is the single largest exhibition of works from African artists from the continent and its diaspora in the UK. For this fifth edition, 130 artists and 42 galleries occupied all three wings at Somerset House in central London drawing in a reported 17,000 visitors. Dükü's works have been selected for many group exhibitions in his France and Ivory Coast, but less so in the US or UK. A major exhibition of his works in Abidjan is being planned for 2018.

Born in 1958 in Ivory Coast, Dükü attended Abidjan's Fine Arts School in the late 1970s before moving to France to study architecture and aesthetics and sciences of art. He now divides his time and practice between both countries though his work is known for transcending way beyond present geographical boundaries and time spans.

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Arts + Culture
Photo courtesy of PULSE Art Fair.

4 Black Artists You Need To See at PULSE Miami Beach 2017

PULSE Miami Beach returns for its 13th edition this weekend, and these are the black artists you can't miss.

PULSE Miami Beach, a fair that dedicates itself to all things contemporary art, goes down at Indian Beach Park this Thursday, December 7 through Sunday, December 10.

This will be the 13th edition for the fair and marks the debut of their new director, Katelijne De Backer. Under her leadership PULSE will welcome its vibrant audience to over 70 galleries from five continents and will introduce 15 first time exhibitors at the fair.

The fair's oceanfront location is the perfect backdrop for a multi-faceted and engaging experience with a range of works from international artists.

You can find the complete rundown of who will be showing art at PULSE Miami Beach here, and read up on the four black artists you need to see at the fair below.

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