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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Wins PEN Pinter Prize

The Nigerian author was awarded one of literature's top prizes for her "refusal to be deterred or detained by the categories of others."

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has just been announced as the winner for the 2018 PEN Pinter Prize.

The prize is annually awarded to a writer from Ireland, Britain, or the Commonwealth and is named after the Nobel-Prize winning playwright and human rights activist Harold Pinter. The award is given to a writer with an "unflinching, unswerving gaze upon the world" who strives "to define the real truth of our lives and our societies."

This year's judges praised Adichie for her "refusal to be deterred or detained by the categories of others," describing her as "sophisticated beyond measure in her understanding of gender, race and global inequality."

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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Appears on 'The Daily Show' To Talk 'Dear Ijeawele'

"You have to name the problem," Adichie says about why she is sticking to the word "feminism."

Last night, on Comedy Central's the Daily Show with Trevor Noah, writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie sat down with Trevor Noah to discuss feminism and her book Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions.

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'And Above All Else, Don't Lie:' Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Urges Harvard's Class of 2018 to Live In Truth

The author was open and honest in her Class Day address at Harvard University on Wednesday.

Prolific Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was the Class Day Speaker yesterday at Harvard University, where she delivered a forthright address about the power of living in truth.

The writer told a memorable anecdote about the time she met a famous writer and stretched the truth by saying she was a fan of his work, though she hadn't read it. His wife immediately responded by asking Adichie which of his works was her favorite. She was then forced to make up an answer: "The one about the man discovering himself?," she said.

The experience left her acutely aware of why the truth matters and impressed by his wife's ability to detect disingenuousness. She urged graduates to recognize that both qualities are important. "I'm not asking you to tell the truth because it will always work out," she said, "But because you will sleep well at night."

"So have a good bullshit detector. If you don't have it now, work on it," she added.

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OkayAfrica’s 100 Women

OkayAfrica's 100 Women is our first annual look at the women making an impact on the African continent and in the diaspora. From the biggest names in culture to young up-and-comers, we've got 'em.

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