Israel's Plan to Deport African Migrants Has Been Suspended—But the Fight Is Far From Over

The Supreme court has given the government until March 26 to "provide more information on the plan."

Israel's controversial government plan, which would force African migrants to leave the country or face prison time, has been suspended by the Supreme Court, after legal action was taken by a group of Eritrean and Sudanese immigrants, reports BBC Africa.

The plan originally gave African migrants, mostly from Sudan and Eritrea $3,500 to leave voluntarily or face detention or possible deportation.

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OkayAfrica's 100 Women

100 Women: Susy Oludele and Alsarah On the Power of Following Your Passion

Nigerian-American hairstylist Susy Oludele and Sudanese-American musician, Alsarah sit down for an enlightening conversation about defying the odds and putting their aspirations first.

Two resilient women from our 2018 list of 100 groundbreaking African Women, Alsarah and Susy Oludele, have an inspirational conversation about their relatable struggles to pursue the career of their dreams.

Susy Oludele is a hair stylist, trendsetter and owner of Hair by Susy, a hair salon in Brooklyn, New York. As a proud Nigerian-American born in the Bronx, she built her brand with the intention to help women of all hair types embrace their natural beauty. Although her shop specializes in natural hair and natural hair extensions, with her magic touch, she speaks life into every hairstyle she creates.

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Khojaly Osman performs in Omdurman, 1970s. Photo Courtesy of Shihab Osman.

You Need to Hear This Mixtape of Vintage, Golden Era Sudanese Music

Ostinato Records founder Vik Sohonie shares details on his upcoming compilation of sounds from Khartoum and Omdurman.

In a meeting with Djibouti's minister of culture in late 2016, we discussed Somali and Afar music from his country. The conversation gradually grew to East African music culture at large and when I asked if he enjoyed the music of Mohamed Wardi, a Sudanese legend, he placed his phone down, adjusted his glasses, put his hands into the heavens and said "Wardi!," as if to imply that we mere mortals have no business speaking so casually about a singer, composer, poet, and activist deified across much of Africa and the Arabic speaking world.

Such is the reputation of Sudanese music, particularly in East Africa and what is often referred to as the "Sudanic Belt," a cultural zone that stretches from Sudan all the way west to Mauritania, covering much of the Sahara and the Sahel, lands where Sudanese artists are household names and Sudanese poems are regularly used as lyrics to produce the latest hits. Sudan is a land of poets. When protesters take to the streets of the capital, they read poems.

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