Sports

Angola Is the First African Country to Win the Amputee World Cup

Angola earned the title after beating Turkey in overtime.

After an intense final match against Turkey, Angola's national amputee football team won the World Cup championship in Guadalajara, Mexico—making them the first African tea m ever to earn the victory.

After the game ended 0-0, the two teams faced off in a penalty shootout, with Angola eventually beating Turkey 5-4, after a Turkish goal was blocked by Angola's goalie Jesus, while a winning spot-kick was secured by Henio Guilerme, reports BBC Sport.

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Sports

​Jamaica's Reggae Girlz Are the First Caribbean Team In History to Qualify for the Women's World Cup

Jamaica's senior national women's team are headed to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France.

Jamaica's national women's soccer team, known as the Reggae Girlz will take their talents to the senior Women's World Cup in France next year for the first time ever, making them the first Caribbean women's team ever to qualify for the games, according to FIFA.com.

It's been a long road to success for the Reggae Girlz. The team folded in 2010, but were brought back in 2014 due to the fervent support of Cedella Marley—the first-born daughter of Bob Marley—who has helped sponsor the team through the Bob Marley Foundation, reports Huffington Post.

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Paul Pogba celebrates after scoring against Portugal during a friendly. Photo: Ajith Kumar (via Flickr/Creative Commons)

France's Blackness

As French scholar Grégory Pierrot points out, "the black players of France are also black players for the entire black world."

The French National Football team has reached its third World Cup final in twenty years. And like when they won it all in 1998, and when they lost in memorable fashion in 2006, their racial makeup seems to be one of the main talking points surrounding them.

In 1998, when France also hosted the tournament, the diverse background of its key players—mainly that of the team's star, Zinedine Zidane, who was born in France to Algerian Berber parents—was used to both celebrate and lament the state of the country as a sort of "melting pot of cultures."

Those who celebrated a team packed with black, Caribbean and Arab players saw its success as proof that France could move forward from its colonial past and into a welcoming, inclusive idea of "Frenchness." Those voices that lamented the same team—mainly heralded by the far-right politician Jean-Marie Le Pen—saw it as a metaphor for fleeting French values, and the disappearance of the "pureness" (or "whiteness") they wanted for France.

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