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The Healing Power of A Tribe Called Quest's New Album

On a dreary week in American history, A Tribe Called Quest release their final album, 'We Got it from Here… Thank You 4 Your Service'

On one of the dreariest days in American history, New York’s hip-hop community gathered to launch one of the most necessary albums in ages.


A Tribe Called Quest is back. Eight months after the tragic passing of Phife Dawg, the legendary New York City hip-hop group have put out their sixth and final studio album. 16 tracks spread across two discs, We Got it from Here… Thank You 4 Your Service features all four of the original Tribe members alongside collaborators like Andre 3000, Kendrick Lamar, Anderson .Paak, Elton John, Kanye West, Talib Kweli and Jack White.

It’s everything.

Okayafrica was at the record’s listening party Wednesday night at MoMA PS1 in the group’s home borough of Queens. Q-Tip and Jarobi White were in the house, as were Tribe family members like Busta Rhymes, Consequence and Phife’s mom, Cheryl Taylor. Long-time friends and collaborators packed the room.

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Attendees inside the modern art museum’s outdoor performance dome had the first opportunity to hear the record in full. Afrocentric visuals and ATCQ animations were projected onto the dome walls as the music played followed by a live discussion between Q-Tip, Jarobi, Busta and Consequence about the making of the record and Tribe’s artistic legacy.

“This room is a testament to what Tribe means historically, what Tribe means currently, what Tribe is going to always mean in the future,” observed Busta.

He was right.

If our nation is to begin to heal, there’s no group with a greater healing power. This is, after all, a group that overcame several breakups and frayed reunions to produce a magnificent final chapter. One we badly needed right now.

We Got it from Here… Thank You 4 Your Service is out now. Stream it via Spotify and Apple Music.

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Photo by Giles Clarke/UNOCHA via Getty Images

Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

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Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.