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After You Watch 'Beasts Of No Nation' On Netflix, Check Out These 10 Movies Of The African Diaspora

To mark the recent premiere of 'Beasts of No Nation,' here are 10 more African films currently available on Netflix.



On Friday, Netflix debuted its first original feature film Beasts Of No Nation on the streaming media platform and in select U.S. theaters. Based on the eponymous 2005 Uzodinma Iweala novel, the story follows Agu, a child soldier who plummets to unspeakable hellish depths as a bloody guerilla war ravages his nameless West African homeland.

Performances by the film's stars Idris Elba and Ghanaian newcomer Abraham Attah have already garnered a tidal wave of critical acclaim and sparked a great deal of Oscar buzz. At the same time, others, like Shadow and Act's Tambay A. Obenson, have expressed valid reservations about the release of "yet another film about child soldiers within the African continent (the danger of a single story)."

Moviegoers are officially able to log on to Netflix and determine for themselves whether the film lives up to the massive hype. While you're there, consider checking out these 10 African movies and documentaries of the Diaspora also streaming on Netflix, as of publication.

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Interview
Photo: Mariela Alvarez.

Interview: ÌFÉ Blends Music & Religion to Honor Those Who Have Died During the Pandemic

Producer and percussionist Otura Mun talks about his latest EP, The Living Dead, and how he traces the influences of West Africa in his new work.

There are bands that open up a spiritual world through their music. ÌFÉ is one example. An electro-futurist band that fuses Afro-Cuban rhythms and Jamaican dancehall with Yoruba mystical voices. With the success of their 2017 debut album "IIII+IIII" (pronounced Eji-Ogbe), ÌFÉ has reached an audience that is looking for Caribbean and contemporary sounds.

The Puerto Rican-based band just released a new EP, The Living Dead- Ashé Bogbo Egun, that aims to heal and honor those who have died during this pandemic. Otura Mun, the band leader, is an African-American producer and percussionist, who began a personal journey about a decade ago, when he landed in San Juan, and decided to move there. He learned Spanish, dug deep into his African ancestry and started to practice the Yoruba-Caribbean religion of Santería.

ÌFÉ, which means "love and expansion" in Yoruba, ties two worlds, music and religion, artistically. This new EP modernized prayer songs to hopefully make them more accessible to a younger generation. OkayAfrica spoke with Otura Mun on his latest work.

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Interview: Adekunle Gold Channels Refreshing Truths Into Afropop

Adekunle Gold achieves an artistic freedom that most mainstream artists don't have through a smooth balance of introspection and club bangers.