News Brief

Brittle Paper Puts a Literary Twist on the Jollof Wars with Hashtag #ReplaceABookTitleWithJollof

Founder of Brittle Paper Ainehi Edoro retweeted the cleverest literary reimaginings Thursday.

Brittle Paper, a go-to blog for all things contemporary African literature, asked followers on Twitter to #ReplaceABookTitleWithJollof Thursday, which prompted blerds to work jollof into famous book titles such as There Was a Country by Chinua Achebe and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s We Should All Be Feminists.


The exercise is especially timely considering Sister Deborah’s ultimate jollof anthem dropped last month, which aimed to claim victory for Ghana in the ongoing #JollofWars among Nigeria, Senegal and Cameroon.

Nigerian founder and curator of Brittle Paper, also a doctoral degree holder of English at Duke University, Ainehi Edoro, who recently penned thought-provoking article “Beyoncé is not shining a light on African literature – it's the other way round,” retweeted the cleverest literary reimaginings. Although she credits Nnanna Esther Nne as the mastermind. Take a look:

We’d love to know how you’d work Jollof into African lit book titles. Tag us at @okayafrica on Twitter.

UPDATE:

UPDATE 6/8/2016:

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.