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John Boyega to Produce South African-Set Crime Thriller 'God Is Good'

He'll also produce the film's soundtrack through his new record label.

John Boyega's year is off to a tremendous start, as it's been announced today that the Nigerian-British actor will executive produce the upcoming South African crime thriller God is Good.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the film, which is described as a cross between Prisoners and City of God, takes place in Cape Flats and "evolves around a pastor and a detective who cross paths after an act of brutal violence sets them on a collision course with a heinous gang lieutenant who will stop at nothing to get to the top."

The film will be written and directed by Willem Grobler, the South African filmmaker behind the award-winning short film Hum. God is Good will be his debut feature-length film.

It is being produced in collaboration with the founder of production company Bandit Country Josephine Rose.

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Image courtesy of Macmillan Children's Publishing Group.

Tomi Adeyemi Shares Release Date for Sequel to 'Children of Blood and Bone'

We won't have to wait much longer!

The sequel to Nigerian-American author Tomi Adeyemi's best-selling young adult novel, Children of Blood and Bone is on its way, and we can't wait.

Children of Blood and Bone, which has spent 44 weeks on the New York Time's Best Seller list, pulls on Yoruba cultural themes and follows the adventures of 17-year-old Zélie Adebola, a brave young girl on a mission to restore magic to the nation of Orisha.

READ: Tomi Adeyemi on Writing the Best and Blackest Fantasy Novel of the Year

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A Rastafarian Girl Was Banned from School in Kenya Because of Her Locks

Her father is now suing the school for discrimination.

A Kenyan school is under fire for turning a young girl away from school because of her hair.

Makeda Ndinda, a Rastafarian student who wears her hair in locks, says she was forced to pick between "hair or books" by the deputy principal of Olympic High School in Kibera when she showed up for class wearing hear hair in a wrap. She was told that only Muslim students were allowed to cover their hair.

The 15-year-old student told Kenya newspaper, The Standard, that the deputy principal sent her home, saying her locks were not acceptable and that she should wear her hair like other pupils instead.

Her family had reportedly already paid for her tuition in full and supplied her books when she was turned away. Ndinda's father, John Mwendwa, has expressed his disappointment and believes she is being discriminated against due to her Rastafarian faith. According to Kenyan outlet Citizen TV, he is taking legal action against the schools' board.

Student who was joining form one has been denied the chance because she is a Rastafarian youtu.be


According to The Standard, there are no laws in the constitution that regulate dress codes on the basis of religion of for any other reason in Kenya. Instead, schools have a mandate to respect religious views and practices.

Folks have been reacting to the story on Twitter, with some pointing out the negative perceptions around people who wear locks in the country.




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