OkayAfrica's 100 Women

In Photos: This Is What OkayAfrica 100 Women's First Gathering of the Month Looked Like

OkayAfrica 100 Women 2019 honorees Clemantine Wamariya, Soull and Dynasty Ogun along with curator Neema Githere imparted fulfilling words on personal storytelling in a panel discussion at Okay Space.

We've hit the ground running celebrating our third iteration of this year's fabulous OkayAfrica 100 Women honorees and Sunday marked our first auxiliary event of the month, bringing the sentiments and purpose of the list to life.

Peeling Back: The Art and Origin of Personal Storytelling was a panel discussion moderated by 2019 honoree and author Clemantine Wamariya. In conversation with curator Neema Githere (replacing honoree Laylah Amatullah Barrayn, who unfortunately couldn't attend due to illness) and fellow honorees Soull and Dynasty Ogun of L'Enchanteur, the women shared with an intimate gathering of supporters in Okay Space their own origin stories, how their stories are ever-evolving and how their anchor and surround themselves with the people—past and present—who are interwoven with their stories too.

Throughout the month of March there will be more opportunities to gather in community to amplify and uplift the 2019 honorees (and each other). Keep tabs on the events page via the OkayAfrica 100 Women website here—and don't forget to RSVP for updates.

Take a look at images from the gathering, with images by Nerdscarf Photography, below.



Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.