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Photo by D'Anthony Photography, courtesy of Studio 189.

NYFW: This Is What Studio 189's First Fall Collection Looks Like

The sustainable fashion brand co-founded by Abrima Erwiah and Rosario Dawson once again levels up this fashion season.

Sustainable fashion brand Studio 189 debuted a stunning fall collection in celebration of their 6-year anniversary at Spring Street Studios during New York Fashion Week.

Sunday Best—the brand's first fall collection—is a color-rich nod to vintage family portraits we know so well taken by the revered photographer Malick Sidibé, Moroccan artist Hassan Hajjaj's eclectic contemporary work, as well as Phyllis Galembo's portrait-style documentation of West African masquerade costumes.

"When we walk around Ghana, for example, we see so many well-dressed people that is reminiscent to us of the old studio style portraits," Abrima Erwiah, co-founder of Studio 189 with actor Rosario Dawson and co-creative director, says in a statement. "We love the idea of people dressing their best—a market seller, a street vendor, a doctor or a lawyer—everyone looks equally amazing."


Opting for a presentation in lieu of their straight-forward (and fabulous) runway show last year, their diverse and inclusive models donned the brand's new editions of floor length ruffle skirts, wide-leg, fitted jumpsuits with blouson sleeves along with pouf blouson sleeves and neck ties to their existing silhouettes. Vibrant hues of indigo, brown and yellow earth tones, with pops of bright red, blue, green and hints of red are a constant in the collection.

Studio 189 continues to be steadfast and consistent in their mission to innovate the value chain of a single garment. "The Fall 2019 collection was designed with taking key lessons learned from the past, applying them to present day, in order to design a product that is made with the next 50 years in mind," the brand declares. "Our goal is to design products that are built to last and can stand the test of time with circularity in mind."

The brand collaborated once again with their artisans and production facility in Ghana, as well as linking with the UN Ethical Fashion Initiative in Haiti and Burkina Faso, as well as design company Xoomba in Burkina Faso.

Take a look at our favorite looks from Studio 189's Sunday Best collection, photographed by D'Anthony Photography, below.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

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Adut Akech poses in winners room after winning the Model of the Year Award during The Fashion Awards 2019 held at Royal Albert Hall on December 02, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Tim Whitby/BFC/Getty Images)

South Sudanese Model Adut Akech Wins Model of the Year at 2019 British Fashion Awards

The 19-year-old model spoke about the need for increased representation in the fashion world during her acceptance speech.

Star model Adut Akech was named 'Model of the Year' at last night's star-studded British Fashion Awards in London, earning her one of the biggest accolades during this year's ceremony.

The 19-year-old, South Sudanese-born model, beat out the likes of Adwoa Aboah, Kaia Gerber and Winnie Harlow to claim the recognition.

During her acceptance speech, Akech, who moved with her family to Australia as a young girl after fleeing South Sudan, touched on the need for better representation of women who look like her in the fashion industry. "It is important for all of us to remember that someone like me winning this award is a rarity," she said.

"This is for the young women and men who found representation and validation in my work. I want them to never be afraid of dreaming big like I once did."

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Image courtesy of Riveriswild

#BuyBlack: The 8 Black-Owned Brands To Shop For On Black Friday 2019

It's that time of year again, here is OkayAfrica's 2019 gift guide for you to #BuyBlack this Friday.

You know we're near the end of 2019 once the holiday season comes back around. Thanksgiving is upon us and the bargain shopping and gift-giving is set to commence thereafter. While this American "holiday" being questionable in of itself, Black Friday is a prime occasion to highlight, support and spend exclusively with black-owned businesses.

Just like we mentioned last year, let's keep the 'for us, by us' energy going. Even beyond the hustle and bustle of Black Friday, tap into the businesses that continue to contribute to wealth-building, development and employment in Black communities around the world.

Here is OkayAfrica's curated shortlist of black-owned brands to take note of this Black Friday, including some standout home decor, fashion, skincare and beauty brands you should know.

Take a look below.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Screenshot from the upcoming film Warriors of a Beautiful Game

In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

Kely Nascimento-DeLuca is looking to change that. As the daughter of international soccer legend Pelé, she is no stranger to the game. Growing up surrounded by the sport, she was actually unaware of the experiences women around the world were having with it. It was only recently that she discovered the hardships around women in soccer and how much it mirrored women's rights more generally.

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