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Photo by D'Anthony Photography, courtesy of Studio 189.

NYFW: This Is What Studio 189's First Fall Collection Looks Like

The sustainable fashion brand co-founded by Abrima Erwiah and Rosario Dawson once again levels up this fashion season.

Sustainable fashion brand Studio 189 debuted a stunning fall collection in celebration of their 6-year anniversary at Spring Street Studios during New York Fashion Week.

Sunday Best—the brand's first fall collection—is a color-rich nod to vintage family portraits we know so well taken by the revered photographer Malick Sidibé, Moroccan artist Hassan Hajjaj's eclectic contemporary work, as well as Phyllis Galembo's portrait-style documentation of West African masquerade costumes.

"When we walk around Ghana, for example, we see so many well-dressed people that is reminiscent to us of the old studio style portraits," Abrima Erwiah, co-founder of Studio 189 with actor Rosario Dawson and co-creative director, says in a statement. "We love the idea of people dressing their best—a market seller, a street vendor, a doctor or a lawyer—everyone looks equally amazing."


Opting for a presentation in lieu of their straight-forward (and fabulous) runway show last year, their diverse and inclusive models donned the brand's new editions of floor length ruffle skirts, wide-leg, fitted jumpsuits with blouson sleeves along with pouf blouson sleeves and neck ties to their existing silhouettes. Vibrant hues of indigo, brown and yellow earth tones, with pops of bright red, blue, green and hints of red are a constant in the collection.

Studio 189 continues to be steadfast and consistent in their mission to innovate the value chain of a single garment. "The Fall 2019 collection was designed with taking key lessons learned from the past, applying them to present day, in order to design a product that is made with the next 50 years in mind," the brand declares. "Our goal is to design products that are built to last and can stand the test of time with circularity in mind."

The brand collaborated once again with their artisans and production facility in Ghana, as well as linking with the UN Ethical Fashion Initiative in Haiti and Burkina Faso, as well as design company Xoomba in Burkina Faso.

Take a look at our favorite looks from Studio 189's Sunday Best collection, photographed by D'Anthony Photography, below.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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