popular
Adamawa State Governor Bindow and the 21 freed girls (c) Adam Dobby

Isha Sesay’s Bold New Book Forces Us to Remember the Chibok Girls, Even If Social Media Has Forgotten

In 'Beneath the Tamarind Tree' the Sierra-Leonean author offers "the first definitive account" of what took place on the ground following the girls' abduction.

Five years ago, 276 schoolgirls were abducted from their school in northern Nigeria by a group of Boko Haram militants. A global outcry ensued with social media and the international press proclaiming their devotion to the missing girls. #BringBackOurGirls became the digital rallying cry for the movement. Even the most famous of public figures—the likes of then First Lady Michelle Obama—stood behind it. This level of attention was unique, and frankly rare for a tragedy occurring in Africa, and it seemed that the help of the entire world was exactly what was needed to topple the threat of growing extremism in Northern Nigeria, and bring the girls home safely.

Then, the world moved on—with the exception of a few. Sierra Leonean-born journalist Isha Sesay, the host of CNN Africa at the time, was one of the foremost voices covering the events taking place in Chibok, following and reporting on every painstaking detail about the girls and their possible whereabouts, even earning the network a Peabody Award in 2014 for her coverage. Her commitment to their story didn't wane—even when it was clear that the news cycle had moved on. For Sesay, the threat of erasure was further motivation to continue following the girls' story. As new developments occurred, beginning in 2016, Sesay hit the ground. She traveled to Chibok and followed those who'd been freed, while continuing to advocate for the immediate release of the 112 girls who are still missing.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Star shine, moon glow from Water Life collection by Aida Muluneh commissioned by WaterAid and supported by H&M Foundation

Ethiopian Artist Aida Muluneh's 'Water Life' Is a Response to the Urgent Threat of Water Scarcity

The photo series, shot in the hottest place on earth, will be showing at Somerset House in London starting this September.

The Ethiopian artist Aida Muluneh will bring her highly-acclaimed photo series "Water Life" to London's Somerset House this September, as part of the creative institution's "ongoing strand of environmental programming." The highly-acclaimed series addresses water scarcity—particularly its grave impact on the wellbeing of women and girls.

Described as an "afrofuturist work," the series was shot in Dallol, Afar in Ethiopia, an extreme setting known to have the hottest and driest conditions on earth. "Taking inspiration from traditional ornamentation and body paint from across the African continent, the Ethiopian-born artist has explored not just issues of water scarcity and ecological emergency but also the vital role of art in advocacy and how Africa is represented in global media," reads a description of "Water Life."

Keep reading... Show less
Video
Photo courtesy of JM Films

Watch Tiwa Savage's Striking New Music Video for '49-99'

On her latest single, the artist references Fela Kuti and addresses poverty in her home country.

Tiwa Savage shares her latest song and video "49-99."

The pulsating track sees the artist referencing Fela Kuti's famous "49 sitting, 99 standing" line from his 1978 song "Shuffering and Shmiling." Throughout the track, the Nigerian artist sings about the pursuit of money in her home country, offering commentary on widespread poverty.

"'49-99' is a term coined from the hard life many Nigerians go through," explains the artist in a press release. "A transit bus serves as a case study. It ought to have only 49 seated passengers, however due to poor economic conditions, we often have nearly twice that number of passengers standing (99)."

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Adut Akech walks the runway during the Valentino Fall/Winter 2019-2020 show as part of Paris Fashion Week on July 03, 2019 in Paris, France. (Photo by Peter White/Getty Images)

'I Feel Like My Entire Race Has Been Disrespected'—Model Adut Akech Responds to Image Blunder in Australian Magazine

"I feel as though this would've not have happened to a white model," said the South Sudanese-Australian model after an image of another model was published alongside her interview in Who magazine.

South Sudanese-Australian model Adut Akech has expressed rightful disappointment after a major publication published a story of her with an image of a different model.

"I feel as though this would've not have happened to a white model," said Akech in a statement shared on Instagram after a photo of fellow model Flavia Lazarus, was published alongside an interview with Akech in Australia's Who magazine. She stated that she felt "angry" and "disrespected" by the blunder. "Not only do I personally feel insulted and disrespected, but I feel like my entire race has been disrespected," she wrote.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.