This New Documentary Explores the Golden Age of Sudanese Music

Sudanese journalist Yousra Elbagir searches for what was lost in part one of her BBC Radio 4 documentary, "No Singing, No Movement."

A new documentary aired on BBC Radio 4 today that takes a deep dive into Sudan's lively musical past.

"I've always known growing up that music was a crucial part of my Sudanese identity—a way for me to connect with my homeland from the UK," Sudanese journalist Yousra Elbagir says. "But, I'm curious to find out what Sudanese music means within its own environment. Not only how it connects us to Sudan, but how it connects us to the world. And I want to find out what was lost."


In the first part of "No SInging, No Movement," Elbagir investigates her homeland's past and present, in light of the abrupt changes that came from Islamic rule in the 1980s.

Photo courtesy of Yousra Elbagir.

You'll hear Elbagir speak with her mother, as she reminisces the days where Louis Armstrong and Ray Charles would come to their country to perform, as well as an introduction to the height of Sudanese music between the 1950s and the 1970s—including the ever popular girl group, The Nightingales.

Elbagir explores the changing atmosphere during that period, including the 80s and early 90s, the restrictions brought in after Sudan's 1989 coup, and digs into what music means in a country that's come up against famine, civil war and economic and political crisis. She looks to legendary musician Sharhabeel Ahmed, who managed to stay on track, for perspective and insight.

Listen to the first part of the documentary here, and stay tuned for part two soon.

This Is How Muslims Observe Ramadan, Tiila and Eid al-Fitr in Tamale, Ghana

The month of Ramadan in the capital of Ghana's Northern Region capital is one of the most beautiful times in the community.

Although Muslims constitute about 18 percent of the population in Ghana, in a Muslim majority area like Ghana's Northern Region—where Muslims are about 60 percent of the population—the religious climate is refreshingly different.

According to data from the 2010 Population and Housing Census recorded by the Ghana Statistical Service, this is the region with the largest number of Muslims in Ghana. The month of Ramadan for many people of Tamale, the regional capital, is one of the most beautiful months of the year because the it dramatically changes many things in the city.

Below, I break down how the holy month is observed in Tamale. And before I proceed, this is not the meat Eid and no, Muslims don't drink even water while fasting.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Photo by A Kid Named Trav.

Relive OkayAfrica & Nike's Epic Naija Worldwide Bash in This New Video

Get a glimpse of the fun and good vibes featuring Burna Boy, Laolu Senbanjo, DJ Tunez and more.

Partner content from Nike

Naija Worldwide, presented by OkayAfrica and Nike, was the epitome of summertime vibes in Brooklyn this summer.

Partygoers came through to The Well to celebrate Nike's triumphant Nigeria kits as Team Nigeria headed to Russia with style. In this recap video, you'll get a glimpse of the fun along with some familiar faces like Laolu Senbanjo, DJ Moniki, DJ Moma and DJ Tunez, along with our surprise performance guest, Burna Boy.

Keep reading... Show less

The Super Eagles Stylishly Beat Iceland in the World Cup & Nigerians Are Going Crazy

All of the best social media reactions from Nigeria's 2-0 win over Iceland.

Nigeria just beat Iceland 2-0 in of the World Cup, leaving them second in Group D.

The Super Eagles started the game in shy form, putting together a first half performance that was at times cold and even dicey.

However, the second half saw the team wake up and fully charge forward. A change of formation had them attacking a lot more, which opened up a counter attack that led to Leicester City winger Ahmed Musa's incredible control touch and strike for the Super Eagles' first goal.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.