Humor

A History of Drake's Uncomfortable Obsession With Sade

We all love the British-Nigerian icon, but Drake manages to take it to a whole other level.

DIASPORA— Drake is obsessed with Sade.


If Drake were Rose and Sade were Jack, he would never have let go. If Sade needed a kidney, and Drake had just one kidney, Sade would be the recipient of a kidney from Drake.

His unbending admiration for the British-Nigerian legend, is common knowledge at this point, but his latest display of this affection takes all the trophies. Each and every single one.

On Wednesday, Drake's Belgian tattoo artist Inal Bersekov posted the rapper's second—that is correct, he has more than one—tattoo of the legendary singer. Drake's latest ink—plastered across his torso—features a portrait of Sade, a top another portrait of Sade, a top an inscription from Sade that reads "with love Sade x," before a backdrop of palm trees, ocean and clouds.

I mean, most living beings love Sade, so his admiration is understandable, but isn't buying her albums or seeing her live in concert, enough? The rest of us seem to think so, but for Drake, it's never enough. The rapper is eternally, continually, repeatedly, incessantly, perpetually, and on every possible occasion, doing too much. By getting this series of Sade tattoos inked on his ribs, like he does not know what permanent is, he has only further confirmed this already established truth.

But to be fair, Drake's past interactions with the singer have foreshadowed his most recent showing of his fixation with her. His intense love was first documented back in 2010 ahead of the release of his debut album, Thank Me Later. “Her brand is so strong and she's such an amazing woman, but the melody she chooses to use and her voice has that dark, sexy feel that a lot of So Far Gone has," he told MTV News.

He went on to coin a term for his musings on Sade. "'Lust for Life,' the 'Houstatlantavegas,' 'The Calm'—those all remind me of 'Sade moments,' he continued. "I'll call them 'Sade moments,' where you hear it, it hits you, and you feel something. When Sade's 'King of Sorrow' comes on, you feel it, consistently. So I just want to try to experiment and see if there's a way to bring her into the hip-hop world. I'm kinda scared. I don't want it to be that moment that everybody's like, 'Whoa, that shouldn't have happened.' So it's really got to be calculated for the right moment...hopefully there will be a great Drake and Sade record for people to listen to, and hopefully it'll be one of the best decisions I've ever made."

Sade was not featured on Thank Me Later—later stating that she was not contacted by his team— but Drake sampled her song "I Will Be Your Friend" on his single "Free Spirit," released in the lead-up to the album.

Earlier this year, Drake revealed that Sade chose to feature Jay Z on the 2010 remix of "The Moon and the Sky," instead of him, which seemed to only fuel his passion. “I was this close to being on it,” he said during an interview with Cal Cast, when recalling another "Sade moment." “But my star wasn’t there yet for her to hear me out.”

Despite the initial disconnect, Sade has warmed up to Drizzy over the years, and might have actually become an enabler.

On Drake's 30th birthday last year, the singer sent him a signed photo of her "Babyfather" single cover. He took to Instagram to share a picture of the gift, with the caption "Woke up to see the most beautiful woman ever in my house."

Woke up to see the most beautiful woman ever in my house. Thank you @ovogelo @valvogt and of course SADE!!! 🎁🌺

A post shared by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on

Pictures of Drakes first tattoo of Sade's face surfaced in March when Swedish tattoo artist Niki Norberg shared the work he had done for Drake on his Instagram page.

🇸🇪🇨🇦 "with love Sade' X" @champagnepapi #bishoprotary #nocturnalink #inkeeze #radiantcolorsink #morelife #drake #sorryforblurrypic

A post shared by Art👈🏼 Tattoo👈🏼Laser👈🏼 (@niki23gtr) on

Last month, the notoriously elusive Sade, showed up to Drake's London show, and the two posed for a few quick snaps along with the rapper's mom. I can't even handle how iconic this moment was, so it's a wonder how Drake managed to keep his shit together during their interaction. He captioned the photos "two very important ladies in my life" when he shared them on Instagram. However, after rearing him and instilling in him the work ethic to become the multimillion dollar-earning entertainer that he is today, I'm curious as to how Drake's mother feels about Sade being put on the exact same pedestal as her. But that is truly neither here, nor there.

🌺

A post shared by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on

Two very important ladies in my life. 🌺

A post shared by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on

And that takes us to the here and now. Drake is now the proud wearer of two, lifelong portraits of Sade. We should have known it would come to this, but still, this whole thing manages to still be slightly surprising and, mostly, wonderfully ridiculous. One Sade tat couldn't suffice, Drake? Is it by force?

This exercise in examining Drake's over the top-ness is not all about throwing shade though. On the flip side of being completely weirded out and amused by his antics, I also respect the man's dedication and soaring level of apathy about what people think or say about him. After all, love is stronger than pride.

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(From left to right) Stéphane Bak and Marc Zinga in 'The Mercy of the Jungle.' Photo courtesy of TIFF.

Congolese Actor Stéphane Bak on His Intense Experience Shooting 'The Mercy of the Jungle' In Uganda

We catch up with the actor after the film made its North American premiere at TIFF.

When actor Stéphane Bak first got the script for The Mercy of the Jungle (La Miséricorde de la Jungle), he knew there was one person he had to consult: his father. "My dad did school me about this," he says. While Bak was born and raised in France, his parents had emigrated from what was then Zaire in the 1980s—before the events of the movie, and not exactly in the same area, but close enough to be able to pass on firsthand knowledge of the simmering ethnic tensions that underpin the action.

The story takes place in 1998, just after the outbreak of the Second Congo War—which came hot on the heels of the First Congo War. Two Rwandan soldiers find themselves separated from their company and have to make a harrowing trek through the jungle to link back up with their regiment. Bak plays Private Faustin, the young recruit hunting Hutu rebels to avenge his murdered family, a foil to Marc Zinga's seasoned Sergeant Xavier. As a Congolese militia swarms the area, and it becomes increasingly difficult to tell enemies from friends, the two are forced off the road and into the thick vegetation.

Their journey is physically difficult, but the jungle also nurtures them, providing food, water, and shelter. "The title is very explicit in a way," says Bak. It is the human beings they encounter, from rival soldiers and militiamen to the hostile security forces guarding illegal gold mining operations, who bring sudden danger and violence. The challenges are conveyed as much through the actors' physicality as through the minimal dialogue. As for the strain on his face, Bak says it was all real. "To be honest, it was very difficult," he says of the shoot, which took him 25 days. "I had to learn my accent in two weeks." Prior to commencing, there was training with the Ugandan army for realism. Due to the ongoing conflicts in the DRC, the movie itself was shot in Uganda.

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Brazil Has Made Yoruba an Official Language

The language will also be incorporated into primary and secondary school curriculum in the country, says the Minister of Culture.

Yoruba history and culture has an undeniably strong presence in Brazilian society, due of course, to the Transatlantic slave trade which brought millions of enslaved West Africans to the Americas. Despite the inhumanity they faced, many managed to keep their ancestral culture and traditions alive.

Centuries have passed, and Yoruba influences still continue to thrive in various regions of the country, as many Brazilians maintain a strong relationship with the language and religion. Its influence can be seen through the music, food and spiritual practices of various communities. Last month the Ooni of Ife—the spiritual leader of the Yoruba people—visited the country, where he was met by crowds of Black Brazilians who turned up to pay their respects.

This connection will likely remain strong for future generations, as the language has now become an official foreign language in the country.

WATCH: How Ilê Aiyê Brought Blackness Back to Carnival

Brazil's Minister of Culture, Dr. Sérgio Sá Leitão, has said that the language will now be incorporated into primary and secondary school curriculum, reports the Nigerian Voice.

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This EP Blends the Afro-Brazilian Rhythms of Bahia With Bass Music

Get into Telefunksoul and Felipe Pomar's Ré_Con Ba$$ EP.

Brazilian producers Felipe Pomar (of TrapFunk & Alivio) and Telefunksoul come through with a dizzyingly energetic EP in the form of Ré_Con Ba$$.

Telefunksoul, who happens to be one of the main promoters of Bahia Bass music, came up with the concept of exploring the rhythms coming out of Recôncavo of Bahia and showing how they can fit into bass music.

Through the 7-track Ré_Con Ba$$ EP, him and Pomar mold and transform the diverse music of Bahia, fusing its rhythms with afrobeat, future house, deep house and much more.

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