Spotlight
Photo courtesy of Nurdin Momodu

Spotlight: Nurdin Momodu Is Using Animation To Share African Ingenuity

We spoke with the 3D artist and animator about his company Lotusfly Animations, Black excellence, and Africa's relationship with technology.

In our 'Spotlight' series, we highlight the work of photographers, visual artists, multimedia artists, and more who are producing vibrant, original work.

In our latest piece, we spotlight Nigerian animator and 3D artist Nurdin Momodu. The Founder of Lotusfly Animations, Lagos-based Momodu's work beautifully articulates his vision of a technologically advanced world where Black excellence shines brightly. The animator founded his animation company in 2015, and has since pushed the boundaries of how African stories are told and shared. Keen on developing how African children see themselves on screens, Momodu and his team of established 3D artists are currently working on a kids' show titled, "Time Tech Kids".

We spoke with Momodu about following your passions, expressing Black excellence, and the representation that matters.

Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

Describe your background as an artist and the journey you've taken to get it to where it is today.

I never dreamt of pursuing a career as an artist, however, I always had an artistic eye. Life and its circumstances forced me to look within and harness the gifts I was given. The lack of jobs after pursuing a degree in microbiology was a turning point, and eight years ago, I discovered 3D animation and taught myself everything I could.

What are the central themes in your work?

I like to explore themes related to Afro-futurism, technology, and science fiction. I also like to look into deep emotions, melancholy and Black excellence.

How did you decide on using a digital medium for your art?

The moment I discovered 3D animation, I knew it was the medium for me -- the possibilities were endless. It felt so natural, I always had a fondness for computers, so expressing my art with one was a no-brainer.

Can you describe your artistic relationship with ‘Afro-futurism’ and African technology?

I think we are inseparable. I produced my first proof of concept titled “Jagabaan” because I wanted to express Black excellence and its relationship with technology and the future.

I imagine a time, far into the future, where Black people -- our culture, technology, stories, struggles of the past and present, and how they shaped the future -- dominate. However, the realities of everyday struggles in Africa make it challenging to envision this future. If my portrayal of Afro-futurism can connect with people just enough to enable them to ponder and believe in a future dominated by Black excellence, I’ll find fulfillment.

Can you talk about your use of colors in your work?

Black and Red are my favorite colors, I find them to be a default palette in my arsenal of colors. However, I am drawn to orange and cyan when lighting a shot or an image, especially when I think on a cinematic scale. I love making darker-looking art, but with a stylized look.

Night shots are particularly my favorite, so I go for desaturated colors with the exception of the focus to enable it to stand out from the background. I have an unhealthy obsession with colored neon lights. LOL.

How has the pandemic affected you creatively?

With the exception of mass hysteria due to Covid, lockdowns, and the #EndSars movement that took place in Nigeria, not much of my lifestyle changed. I began working from home in early 2019, and have been since, so the lockdown didn’t affect me much. I had an influx of jobs, so I spent most of the year working and improving my craft.

Photo by LotusFly Animations courtesy of Nurdin Momodu

Arts + Culture
Image courtesy of the artist

Spotlight: Timi Nathus Is Making Digital Art Mainstream

The Nigerian artist NAZQUIAT is on a mission to make his futuristic collection of NFTs the norm in his home country.

In our 'Spotlight' series, we highlight the work of photographers, visual artists, multimedia artists, and more who are producing vibrant, original work.

In our latest piece, we spotlight Nigerian multidisciplinary digital artist, Timi Nathus aka NAZQUIAT. Nathus's shares his #Afrotroves NFT collection with us, and explains it as "Each NFT was made from sacred artifacts that were previously stolen and haven't set foot in Africa hundreds of years". Nathus and a cohort of digital artists are reclaiming the images and stories that were stolen, and instead using them to empower and inform his own communities. By breaking the mold of traditional art and storytelling, Nathus's decision to establish this collection as a series of NFTS is shifting the power struggle and encourages the celebrations of the old and new.

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