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Danai Gurira and Lupita Nyong'o with models at the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

This Is What the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase Looked Like

Here's a first look at pieces by the designers who worked with Marvel to create one of a kind pieces for "Black Panther."

As we all know, Marvel's Black Panther is one of the most highly anticipated movies to come out this year. What's even more exciting is the costume and design of the movie—which we got a sneak peek of during the Marvel Studios Black Panther "Welcome to Wakanda" New York Fashion Week presentation.


Designs from CHROMAT, Cushnie et Ochs, Fear of God, Ikiré Jones, Laquan Smith, Sophie Theallet, and Tome, who all worked with Marvel to create one of a kind pieces that played into the theme of the movie, were featured at the showcase. The night was filled with stars and models including Slick Woods, Leomie Anderson, Precious Lee, and Shaun Ross. Actors Ilfenesh Hadera (Baywatch, She's Gotta Have It), Ashleigh Murray (Riverdale), Carra Patterson (Straight Outta Compton), Broderick Hunter (Insecure), Aubrey Joseph (Cloak & Dagger) were also in attendance. The room was full with drinks, laughter, familiar faces, media partners and friends.

We caught up with Walé Oyéjide, designer and creative director of Ikiré Jones, who talked to us about working on the Black Panther costume and design team.

"It was an obvious marriage because of the cultural relevance," he says. "This movie signifies everything my brand and the immigrant stories stands for, so I'm quite happy to be a part of it."

Oyéjide tells us he's got big plans for this year including his TED Talk that's dropping soon, along with his latest collection, LOOK AT GOD, that you can see here.

Check out the looks and attendees from last night's showcase below.

Danai Gurira and Lupita Nyong'o with models at the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

Walé Oyéjide with models at the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

Fashion on display at the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

Fashion on display at the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

Models pose during the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

A model poses at the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

A model poses at the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

A model poses at the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

A model poses with designer Laquan Smith during the Black Panther 'Welcome to Wakanda' NYFW Showcase. Photo: Getty Images for Marvel.

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