Bobi Wine's Lawyer Says His Health Is 'In Dire State' Following First Court Appearance

The Ugandan artist and opposition lawmaker appeared in court on Thursday, where he was charged with "illegal possession of arms."

UPDATE 8/16/18: Bobi Wine appeared in a military court today, where his charges were reduced from treason to illegal possession of arms, though music executive and friend of Wine, Rikki Stein, tells OkayAfrica that the hotel manager where Wine was staying in Aura claims "categorically" that there were no weapons found in Wine's room.

He is being remanded in custody until next week Thursday.

According to one of Wine's lawyer, Asuman Basalirwa who was present during the arraignment, Wine had been badly beaten while in police custody and was unable to walk properly.

His other lawyer Medard Segona went into further detail about Wine's condition following his court appearance. He is quoted in the Daily Monitor as saying:

Mr Kyagulanyi's health is in dire state. He is in great pain. He can't talk, he can't walk, he sits with a lot of difficulty, his face is swollen and he cannot see because of the torture by SFC soldiers. He couldn't speak when the charges were read to him and I believe he didn't know what was going or understood the charges read to him.

According to Segona, Wine was unable to take a plea due to his condition.

Kassiano Wadri the by-election candidate who Wine was in Aura supporting, who was also arrested alongside Wine, has won the election.

Continue for yesterday's story:


Ugandan politician and musician Robert Kyagulanyi, popularly known as Bobi Wine, has been charged with treason, following a deadly clash with Ugandan police forces in Aura on Monday that left his driver dead.

There are also reports that Wine is currently in the hospital receiving treatment, reports Africa News.

The artist and lawmaker was arrested on Tuesday along with several other legislators and opposition supporters, following a run-In that occurred at a by-election campaign where Wine and Uganda's president Museveni were supporting opposing candidates. Police forces claimed that stones were pelted at the Presidents vehicle, causing the police to intervene with bullets and teargas.

Wine was barricaded in his hotel room for several hours on Monday before being taken into custody. Police spokesperson Josephine Angucia announced that Wine along with by-election candidate Kassiano Wadri will be charged with malicious damage to the motor vehicle belonging to the convoy of the President, unlawful possession of firearms and treason.

Authorities claim that both men were carrying heavy ammunition with them upon being arrested. Police claim to have collected "75 rounds of ammunition, 46 white tablets suspected to be drugs, Ugandan flags, red t-shirts and smartphones among other items found in the rooms of the legislators at Aura Pacific Hotel."

Wine is set to appear in court tomorrow.

Since winning a seat in parliament in 2017, Wine has been the target of harassment from the Ugandan government, but this appears to be the most serious incident thus far.

Many have expressed support for the 35-year-old MP online, stating that they believe that he has once again been unfairly targeted by Museveni, who is known to use force and violence to suppress the opposition. Supporters of Wine are demanding that he be freed immediately using the hashtags #ReleaseBobiWine and #FreeBobiWine.






(From left to right) Stéphane Bak and Marc Zinga in 'The Mercy of the Jungle.' Photo courtesy of TIFF.

Congolese Actor Stéphane Bak on His Intense Experience Shooting 'The Mercy of the Jungle' In Uganda

We catch up with the actor after the film made its North American premiere at TIFF.

When actor Stéphane Bak first got the script for The Mercy of the Jungle (La Miséricorde de la Jungle), he knew there was one person he had to consult: his father. "My dad did school me about this," he says. While Bak was born and raised in France, his parents had emigrated from what was then Zaire in the 1980s—before the events of the movie, and not exactly in the same area, but close enough to be able to pass on firsthand knowledge of the simmering ethnic tensions that underpin the action.

The story takes place in 1998, just after the outbreak of the Second Congo War—which came hot on the heels of the First Congo War. Two Rwandan soldiers find themselves separated from their company and have to make a harrowing trek through the jungle to link back up with their regiment. Bak plays Private Faustin, the young recruit hunting Hutu rebels to avenge his murdered family, a foil to Marc Zinga's seasoned Sergeant Xavier. As a Congolese militia swarms the area, and it becomes increasingly difficult to tell enemies from friends, the two are forced off the road and into the thick vegetation.

Their journey is physically difficult, but the jungle also nurtures them, providing food, water, and shelter. "The title is very explicit in a way," says Bak. It is the human beings they encounter, from rival soldiers and militiamen to the hostile security forces guarding illegal gold mining operations, who bring sudden danger and violence. The challenges are conveyed as much through the actors' physicality as through the minimal dialogue. As for the strain on his face, Bak says it was all real. "To be honest, it was very difficult," he says of the shoot, which took him 25 days. "I had to learn my accent in two weeks." Prior to commencing, there was training with the Ugandan army for realism. Due to the ongoing conflicts in the DRC, the movie itself was shot in Uganda.

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Brazil Has Made Yoruba an Official Language

The language will also be incorporated into primary and secondary school curriculum in the country, says the Minister of Culture.

Yoruba history and culture has an undeniably strong presence in Brazilian society, due of course, to the Transatlantic slave trade which brought millions of enslaved West Africans to the Americas. Despite the inhumanity they faced, many managed to keep their ancestral culture and traditions alive.

Centuries have passed, and Yoruba influences still continue to thrive in various regions of the country, as many Brazilians maintain a strong relationship with the language and religion. Its influence can be seen through the music, food and spiritual practices of various communities. Last month the Ooni of Ife—the spiritual leader of the Yoruba people—visited the country, where he was met by crowds of Black Brazilians who turned up to pay their respects.

This connection will likely remain strong for future generations, as the language has now become an official foreign language in the country.

WATCH: How Ilê Aiyê Brought Blackness Back to Carnival

Brazil's Minister of Culture, Dr. Sérgio Sá Leitão, has said that the language will now be incorporated into primary and secondary school curriculum, reports the Nigerian Voice.

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This EP Blends the Afro-Brazilian Rhythms of Bahia With Bass Music

Get into Telefunksoul and Felipe Pomar's Ré_Con Ba$$ EP.

Brazilian producers Felipe Pomar (of TrapFunk & Alivio) and Telefunksoul come through with a dizzyingly energetic EP in the form of Ré_Con Ba$$.

Telefunksoul, who happens to be one of the main promoters of Bahia Bass music, came up with the concept of exploring the rhythms coming out of Recôncavo of Bahia and showing how they can fit into bass music.

Through the 7-track Ré_Con Ba$$ EP, him and Pomar mold and transform the diverse music of Bahia, fusing its rhythms with afrobeat, future house, deep house and much more.

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