News Brief

Students Have Been Protesting In Eritrea Against the Government Interfering with Their School

Anti-government protests are rare in Eritrea, as the country does not protect the freedom to protest.

Students in Asmara, Eritrea, staged a demonstration Tuesday to protest the government's interference in the affairs of a community-funded Muslim school, BBC reports.


The students attend Diae Al Islam, one of the best private schools in the capital. They offer both secular and Islamic education. Their protest was a response to reports that its chairman, Hajj Musa Mohammed Nur, 90, and other members of the school board were arrested after pushing back against the government's attempts to regulate the school.

BBC reports a video circulating on social media that shows Nur speaking before his arrest, saying that authorities demanded that the school drop religious teachings, ban the hijab and stop the separation of sexes.

There have also been reports of shooting in the city, where Information Minister Yemane Meskel downplayed reports of violence on Twitter.

Some Eritreans on the platform seem to agree with Meskel.

The U.S. Embassy, however, said it received reports of gunfire in "several locations."

According to Tesfalem Araia of BBC's Tigrinya service, the Eritrean government cut off internet access in the wake of the protest, as messages aren't coming in from people in the country.

Eritrea has been under rule by President Isaias Afwerki for 26 years. Anti-establishment protests like this in the country are very rare because of its restrictions and not having a constitution that guarantees the rights of citizens, including the right to protest.

African Athletes Break Barriers at 2018 Winter Olympics

They did it for the culture.

The 2018 Winter Olympics have undoubtedly been a monumental one for African athletes.

Several national teams from across the continent made their triumphant Olympic debuts, challenging years upon years of white domination at the games. These athletes hail from Eritrea, Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, South Africa and more.

These athletes had won the games, even before any medals were awarded, solely based on the fact that their achievements have broken ground for future athletes from the continent.

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You Need to Hear Odie's Industrial Afrobeats Sound In 'Faith'

The 21-year-old producer & singer has been channeling his Nigerian roots into next level fusions.

After jumping back into the scene with the smooth alternative R&B; track "Little Lies" a couple of weeks ago, Odie is back at it with a more up-tempo sound this time around.

"Faith" is the infectious new single off the producer-cum-singer's upcoming project, Analogue, which is due in the spring.

The Toronto-born, Bay Area-raised artist lets his Nigerian roots come alive with the song which incorporates both industrial sounds and afrobeats. The 21-year-old talent has previously stated that he is influenced by the likes of Kid Cudi, Chris Martin, and Fela Kuti. It's not hard to spot how seamlessly he is blending these varied styles in his music.

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This Zambian Filmmaker Won a BAFTA for Her Debut Film 'I Am Not a Witch"

The filmmaker say her win "was a real big shock."

"I Am Not a Witch," a Zambian film about a nine-year-old girl, played by Maggie Mulubwa, sentenced to exile at a witch camp, earned the award for Outstanding debut at the 2018 BAFTA's.

Zambian-born filmmaker, Rungano Nyoni, who moved to wales at the age of 9, expressed genuine shock over the win. "I was waiting for my category to go so I could go to the toilet," said Nyoni afterwards. "It was a real big shock."

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