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Photo: Martien Riedel. Courtesy of Piranha Records.

The Godfather of Nubian Soul

Listen to the reissue of Ali Hassan Kuban's 1988 album From Nubia to Cairo.

Ali Hassan Kuban made his name across Egypt, the Arab world and Europe in the 1980s, his music becoming so popular it earned him the moniker, the Godfather of Nubian Soul.

The self-taught musician's career started when he moved from the Upper Egypt to Cairo, "mastered the pentatonic roots repertoire of black Egypt and became one of the most popular wedding musicians up and down the Nile," the label Piranha Records writes.

1988's From Nubia to Cairo, which was originally passed around on two cassettes, is considered one of the first milestones of urban Nubian pop. The seven songs on the album showcase Ali Hassan Kuban's blend of ancient Nubian melodies with more Western influences like jazz and American pop.

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Melania Trump Embarks on Her Solo Tour of 'Several African Countries'—Twitter Reacts

The first lady arrived in Ghana this morning, and folks aren't enthused.

In August, it was announced that first lady, Melania Trump would be making her way to "several countries in Africa" as her first solo tour since that man she married took office, to supposedly promote healthcare and education programs ran by US foreign aid organizations.

She touched down in Accra, Ghana this morning, the first stop on her week-long tour of the continent, which will also includes stops in Kenya, Malawi and Egypt where she'll go to "foster diplomatic relations," BBC Africa reports. She was welcomed by first lady Rebecca Akufo-Addo and the two exchanged gifts, adds ABC News.

She'll also be implementing her Be Best program aimed at tackling cyberbullying, which is just really ironic considering she lives with the biggest cyberbully in the world. It's also strange that we're somehow supposed to believe that someone complicit in Trump's baleful treatment of immigrant children in the United States would care about African children.

Nonetheless, the first lady says she's "interested in Africa because she has never been before and knows that each country will have its own unique history and culture."

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New Egypt CyberLaw Adds to the Growing List of Social Media Regulations this Summer

Various African governments have been adding cyberlaws this summer triggering discussions about the threat to free speech online.

Teju Cole once said that twitter is an African city, and various governments continue to take this to new levels from social media taxes to more surveillance.

On Sunday, a new law regulating social media use was passed by two-thirds of the MPs in Egypt's parliament and has now been sent to President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi for his approval. The law states that social media users with more than 5000 followers will be under the supervision of Egypt's Supreme Council for the Administration of the Media. Since the law applies to blogs and websites, social media users with thousands of followers will be regulated as media outlets.

The BBC reports that the council will have the power to block websites and file criminal charges against platforms and individuals accused of "inciting people to violate laws" and "defamation against individuals and religions".


Governments have been cracking down on social media use for years now, but in these last few months we have seen another surge of politicians shamelessly blaming social media for political conflicts as justification for more online surveillance. In Uganda, President Museveni claimed that a social media tax would help the country's debt and regulate gossip causing public backlash. In Cameroon, the prime minister Mr. Philemon blamed social media and the diaspora for "hate speech" and "ordering murders."

While humor has been a large response on twitter to these policies, it's worth tracking these regulations as more governments take stronger measures against social media "dissent."

In the case of Egypt, this new law is raising fear about what other regulations might be put in place against critiques of the president and the government.



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