This Nigerian Man Broke a Guinness World Record By Reading Aloud For 5 Days Straight

Olawunmi Bayode says he did it out of his love for reading, and to encourage young people to read more.

This is what you call dedication:

Olawunmi Bayode of Lagos, Nigeria just earned himself a place in the Guinness Book of World Records for reading aloud for 120 hours straight. Bayode began his reading on February 26 at approximatley 1:30 PM, and ended on March 3, reports Brittle Paper. According to This Is Africa, Bayode read non-stop, taking only one, two hour break everyday.

He ran through 17 titles, mostly by African authors, including Toni Kan's The Carnivorous City, Sarah Ladipo Manyika's Independence, Leye Adenle's Easy Motion Tourist, Barack Obama's The Audacity of Hope and more.

Bayode surpassed the previous record held by Deepak Sharma Bajagain of Nepal, who read aloud for an impressive 113 hours and 15 minutes.

The marathon reading took place at the Herbert Macaulay Library in Yaba, where several supporters came to watch and cheer him on.

Many Nigerians, even former Vice President Atiku Abubakar, have expressed pride in Bayode's accomplishment, and have shared overwhelmingly positive responses via social media.

Bayode was received by the Lagos-state governor, Akinwunmi Ambode, for his accomplishment this morning.

By bringing this title to Nigeria he's only strengthening the country's already rich literary tradition. Major congrats to the record-holder!


Angélique Kidjo Wants To "Bring Rock Back To Africa" With Her New Talking Heads Album

The Grammy Award-winning Beninese singer is re-imagining the Talking Heads' classic album, Remain In Light.

When most people think of music originating from the African continent, rock isn't exactly what comes to mind.

But Angélique Kidjo was quick to remind us in a recent interview with Rolling Stone that "rock music came from the blues and thus from Africa." With her newest album, Remain in the Light, Kidjo looks to re-imaging the landmark Talking Heads album, which was widely considered to be one of the top albums of the 1980s and was deeply influenced by Fela Kuti's afrobeat.

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100 Women: Nomzamo Mbatha Wants Black Women to Know That They "Don't Have to Be Polite"

The South African actor, humanitarian and spokesmodel talks her rise to stardom, and letting her voice be heard.

Nomzamo Mbatha is a star—plain and simple.

The South African actor, spokesmodel and humanitarian has carved out a unique path for herself in the industry, and she's inspiring other young black women to do the same, unapologetically.

In our latest video, the 100 women honoree tells us how she discovered her passion for the arts at an early age growing up under the care of her grandmother, and she explains why it's vital that black women cease being "polite" for the sake of others—there's no room for timidity.

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Zubz, Thapelo Mashiane, Melly Mel, Lebo Mochudi and Captain. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Zubz & The Assembly’s New EP Is A Much-Needed Dose Of Positivity

We talk to South African hip-hop artists The Assembly and Zubz about their new collaborative EP, Podcast.

"I don't need to record another song for the rest of my life," says veteran South African rapper Zubz. "So every time I record a song, it's because something has moved me, and made me wanna do it."

So, him working on a 3-track EP with the trio The Assembly—made up of Melly Mel, Captain and Lebo Mochudi—was one of those cases where he was moved. "These dudes, you can tell from their vibe and energy, hip-hop is who they are, not just something they do. It runs in their blood. They make music," he says.

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