Arts + Culture

Diaspora Eats: 7 of the Best African Restaurants in Los Angeles

Here are seven of the best African restaurants in Los Angeles.

DIASPORA—The diaspora is brimming with a variety of restaurants that offer savory dishes that’ll  remind you of mom’s cooking.


In our Diaspora Eats series, we highlight these many eateries, and offer recommendations for the best African food in whichever major city you might find yourself in. 

Whether you’re looking for options to fit your dietary restrictions or you’re simply looking to stuff your face with quality eats, there’s a spot in the city that will cater to your palette. Below are 7 African restaurants to check out while you’re in Madrid.

Check out some of the best African food in HoustonLondonNew YorkParis, and Washington D.C.Amsterdam, Toronto and Madrid

Nkechi African Cafe

Get your rice, plantain, egusi and all your favorite Nigerian staples, in this cozy spot located on Manchester Boulevard in Inglewood. Be sure to try their jollof rice and goat meat stew.

#TheView 😍 Jollof rice & goat meat 😍De 🇳🇬way

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Merkato Ethiopian Restaurant

You may have seen Insecure's Molly and Issa eating at this casual spot on Fairfax Ave. Visit Merkato to get your fix of classic Ethiopian cuisine in one of Little Ethiopia's most popular eateries.

Thursday night in Little Ethiopia❤️💚💛 🇪🇹

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Rahel Ethiopian Vegan Cuisine

Injera is naturally vegan, but this spot, located on South Fairfax, is considered the only "100 percent vegan Ethiopian restaurant anywhere."

*heavy breathing*

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Tagine Beverly Hills

This Bevery Hills eatery, serves à la carte Moroccan dishes like tagine with couscous, as well as several pescatarian and vegetarian options. The atmosphere is warm and cozy and, if you're lucky, you might just run into co-owner Ryan Gosling while you're there.

Oven Roasted #bonemarrow #dates #prunes #figs #caramilzedonions, what else can we say?!

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Revolutionario North African Tacos

This small, take-out spot on Jefferson Boulevard offers unique North-African-style tacos. Try their cilantro yogurt chicken taco,  the shakshouka, or the pozole tagine. If you're in the mood to try something new and flavorful stop at Revolutionario North African Tacos for a quick bite.

Kenyan Cafe and Cuisine

This Kenyan restaurant, located just outside of Los Angeles in Anaheim, serves delactables like Mbuzi Choma (BBQ Lamb), kachumabri and fired tilapia.

Banadir Somali Restaurant

Visit this Somali eatery, located in Inglewood, for a hearty breakfast, lunch or dinner. Their savory goat and lamb options and large portions will leave you full, and your taste buds satisfied.

Yum! #somalifood #chicken #anjero #banadirsomalirestaurant #inglewoodeats #inglewood #foodgasm

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Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

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