News Brief

Here Are the 2018 AMAA Nominees

The 2018 African Movie Academy Awards heads to Kigali, Rwanda this September.

The nominees for the 2018 African Movie Academy Awards were announced over the weekend, where films, its directors and stars from the continent and its diaspora are to be celebrated for their contribution to African film.

The awards ceremony is in its 14th year, and will be held at the Rwandan Convention Center in Kigali Rwanda.

The AMAA's livestreamed the announcement of the nominees on Twitter:

Take a look at the full list of 2018 AMAA nominees below:


Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Seun Ajayi – Ojukokoro

Lionel Newton – Pop Lock 'N' Roll

Akah Nani – Banana Island Ghost

Richard Lukunku – Lucky Specials

Gideon Okeke – Cross Roads

AYIAM OSIGWE FOUNDATION Award for Best Nigerian Film

Cross Roads

In My Country

Isoken

Hotel Called Memory

Ojukokoro

Lost Café

Icheke Oku

Best Young/Promising Actor

Patrick Dibuah – Banana Island Ghost

Austin Enabulele – In My Country

Cindy Sanyu – Bella

Anine Lansari – The Blessed Vost (Les Bienheureux)

Maurice Paige – Pop Lock 'N' Roll

Nichole Ozioma Banna – Icheke Oku

Zainab Balogun – Sylva

TONY ELUMELU Award for Best Comedy

Sidechic Gang – Ghana

Banana Island Ghost – Nigeria

The Adventures Of Supermama – South Africa

Koko: The Box TV – Nigeria

Best Actress in a Leading Role

Kate Henshaw – Roti

Reine Swart – Siembamba

Okawa Shaznay – In My Country

Dakore Egbuson – Isoken

Nana Ama McBrown, Lydia Forson and Sika Osei – Sidechic Gang

Mariam Phiri – The Road To Sunrise

Tunde Aladese – Lost Café

Joselyn Dumas – Potato Potahto

Best First Feature Film by a Director

My Mothers Story – Flora Suya | Malawi

Ogwuetiti Obiuto – Onyeka Nwelue | Nigeria

Five Fingers for Marseilles - Michael Mathews | South Africa

Isoken – Jadesola Osiberu | Nigeria

18 Hours – Njue Kevin | Kenya

Banana Island Ghost – BB Sasore | Nigeria

The Blessed Vost – Sefia Djama | Algeria

Best Director

Jade Osiberu – Isoken

Michael Mathews – Five Fingers For Marseilles

Frank Rajah Arase – In My Country

Safia Djama – The Blessed Vost

Oluseyi Siwoku – Cross Roads

Shemu Joyah – Road to Sunshine

Darrell Roodt – Siembamba

Akin Omotosho – Hotel Called Memory

Peter Kofi Sedufia – Sidechic Gang

The Lost Café – Kenneth Gyang

Best Film

Isoken – Nigeria

Five Fingers For Marseilles – South Africa

In My Country – Nigeria

The Blessed Vost – Algeria

Cross Roads – Nigeria

Road to Sunshine – Malawi

Siembamba – South Africa

Hotel Called Memory – Nigeria

Sidechic Gang – Ghana

Lost Café – Kenneth Gyang

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Sika Osei – In Line

Sivenathi Mabuya – Lucky Specials

Rahama Sadau – Hakkunde

Toyin Abraham – Esohe

Joke Silva – Potato Potahto

Best Actor in a Leading Role

Vuyo Dabula – Five Fingers For Marseille

Richard Mofe Damijo – Cross Roads

Sam Dede – In My Country

Sani Bouajla – The Blessed Vost

OC Ukeje – Potato Potahto

Chris Attoh – Esohe

Oros Mampofu – Lucky Specials

Frank Donga – Hakkunde

MICHAEL ANYIAM OSIGWE Award for Best Film by an African Living Abroad

Minister – Nigeria/Italy

Alexandra – Nigeria/USA

Low Lifes And High Hopes – Nigeria/Austria

Best Diaspora Short

Torments of Love – Guadeloupe

Baby Steps – USA

Intercept – USA

Best Diaspora Documentary

Evolutionary Blues – USA

Barrows: Freedom Fighter – Barbados

Sammy Davis Jr.: I've Got To Be Me – USA

EFERE OZAKO Award for Best Short Film

Dem Dem – Senegal/Belgium

Zenith – Cameroon/USA

It Rains on Ouga – Burkina Faso

In Shadows – Kenya

Coat of Harm – Nigeria

Tikitat Soulima – Morocco

Nice, Very Nice – Algeria

Visions (Shaitan, Buruja, Brood) – Nigeria

Fallou – Senegal

Still Water Runs Deep – Nigeria/USA

Best Animation

Group Photo – Nigeria

Belly Flop – South Africa

Untitled – Ghana

Crush – Nigeria

Best Documentary

Bigger Than Africa – Nigeria/USA

Winnie – South Africa

Boxing Libreville – Gabon

Silas – South Africa/Kenya

When Babies Don't Come – South Africa

Uncertain Future – Burundi

We Came In Sprint Carts – South Africa

OUSMANE SEMBENE Award for Best Film in an African Language

Mansoor – Nigeria

Five Fingers For Marseilles – South Africa

Icheke Oku – Nigeria

Agwaetiti Obiuto – Nigeria

Nyasaland – Malawi

Tunu – Tanzania

Best Diaspora Narrative Feature

Angelica – Puerto Rico

Love Jacked – Canada

Charlie: La Vie Magnifique Charlie – USA

Achievement in Production Design

Kada River

Five Fingers For Marseille

Tatu

In My Country

Cross Roads

Achievement in Costume Design

Icheke Oku

Cross Roads

Esohe

Five Fingers For Marseille

Isoken

Achievement in Make-Up

Siembamba

Icheke Oku

Five Fingers For Marseille

Esohe

The Road To Sunshine

Achievement in Soundtrack

The Road To Sunshine

Tatu

Hotel Called Memory

Isoken

Siembamba

Achievement in Visual Effect

Siembamba

Icheke Oku

Lucky Specials

Esohe

Kada River

Achievement in Sound

The Lost Café

The Road To Sunshine

Hotel Called Memory

Pop Lock 'N' Roll

Sidechic Gang

Achievement in Cinematography

The Road To Sunshine

Five Fingers For Marseille

The Lost Café

The Blessed Vost (Les Bienheureux)

Siembamba

Achievement in Editing

Hotel Called Memory

Pop Lock 'N' Roll

Lucky Specials

The Blessed Vost (Les Bienheureux)

Siembamba

Achievement in Screenplay

The Women

Potato Potahto

Ojukokoro

Five Fingers For Marseille

Hakkunde

The Lost Café

Photo: Matteo Prandoni and BFA

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