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Listen to 2Baba's New 13-Track Album 'Warriors'

2Baba's new album features Burna Boy, Olamide, Wizkid, Tiwa Savage, Peruzzi and more.

2Baba has just dropped his much-anticipated album titled Warriors.

The album is a follow-up to the artist's last project Ascension which was released in 2014. Warriors features music heavyweights including Burna Boy, Olamide, Tiwa Savage, Wizkid, AJ, Peruzzi, Syemca and HI Idibia.


In his latest offering, 2Baba gives fans a little bit of everything—Afrobeats, Afropop and even reggae.

His track with Olamide "I Dey Hear Everything" is an uptempo Afrobeats number with an infectious rhythm that's accentuated by the string instrumental in the background.

In "We Must Groove" featuring Burna Boy, 2Baba switches to a reggae melody with a heavy Jamaican-style lyricism. While a fairly mid-tempo, the overall feel of the song is laidback and will have you wanting to wind that waist. Additionally, the brass instrumentals of the track definitely add the right amount of bounce.

His collaboration with Tiwa Savage titled "Ginger" is an adorable love jam with subtle psychedelic explorations and synthesised sounds. It's definitely a much softer-sounding track compared to the others and makes for some really easy listening.

Slowing the pace down even more, "Warriors" focuses more on the lyrical content of the song and makes ensures the beat, instrumentals and melody all fall back so the song's central message of survival and working past failures is at the fore.

It's an album filled with undeniable gems and you'll probably need you to have it on it repeat to discover your faves. 2baba is back baby, and we're certainly for it.

Listen to Warriors on Apple Music below:

Listen to Warriors on Spotify:

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Image vcourtesy of artist.

Valerie Omari Shines in Apple Music's 'New Artist Spotlight'

Apple Music honors Congolese-born and Cape Town-based musician Valerie Omari as this month's artist to look out for.

Apple Music's "New Artist Spotlight" for this month is Congolese-born and Cape Town-based singer Valerie Omari.

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Rexxie and Kel-P Set to Go Head-To-Head in 'Battle of Hits'

Two of Nigeria's biggest producers are set to face off on Instagram Live in a 'Battle of Hits' you won't want to miss out on.

Rexxie and Kel-P, two of Nigeria's biggest producers, are set to face off in a "Battle of Hits" on Instagram Live today at 10 PM (WAT).

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South African Actor Charles 'Big Boy' Maja Has Passed Away

Tributes are pouring in for the beloved actor who starred in the popular South African television drama 'Skeem Saam'.

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Image courtesy of Nicole Rafiki.

Spotlight: Nicole Rafiki's Images Merge the Contemporary with the Traditional to Challenge Stereotypes

Get familiar with the work of Norway-based Congolese visual artist Nicole Rafiki.

In our 'Spotlight' series, we highlight the work of photographers, visual artists, multimedia artists and more who are producing vibrant, original work. In our latest piece, we spotlight Nicole Rafiki, a Congolese visual artist who uses symbolism to challenge stereotypes in a critical way. Read more about the inspirations behind her work below, and check out some of her stunning images underneath. Be sure to keep up with the artist on Instagram and Facebook and her Rafiki Arts Initiative here.


How would you describe yourself as an artist?

As an interdisciplinary artist, I use symbolism to re-imagine and challenge the stereotypical depiction of spaces, contexts and the people who are affected by global migration. I view my work as a platform for dialogues about identity, fluidity, place, and belonging. As an artist with a diverse cultural, historic and artistic background, I use art to inform, engage and heal. Because it is too easy to fall into the trap of promoting idealism or clichés, I make it a point to be critical and analytical in my work.

What is the message behind your recent photo-series "The Crown"?

This work came about after I had been stuck in Lagos traffic for 2 hours, listening to a radio show about the role of women in the household. One middle-aged woman called in to say that a "proper woman has to be domesticated". Listening to that radio show just made it seem like, for many people, it doesn't matter how educated, professionally accomplished or otherwise successful a woman is as long as she does not have the required domestic skills required by the African society. The urban attire complemented by traditional African elements illustrates the double role that many young African women have in our communities. And yet, that point is made against a yellow backdrop, symbolizing our power, historical achievements, hope and optimism for the future.

As an African artist, what do you want to communicate with your art about the continent?

The core message in my art is the promotion of our personal and collective healing process. That is only possible if we all understand the importance of playing our part. I believe that this is a very important time to be active in the contemporary art field. We have reached a historical point where Africans from the continent and the diaspora are challenging the status quo in the art industry by creating their own platforms to discuss, share and challenge the dominating philosophical, artistic, political and cultural perspectives on art. We have the power, individually and collectively to create a different legacy for the next generation and have personally just begun exploring all the possibilities out there.

Nicole Rafiki merges contemporary and traditional visual art. "Mkono" (2018), in loving memory of my grandmother.Image courtesy of Nicole Rafiki.


Nicole Rafiki merges contemporary and traditional visual art. "Untitled" (2019), in loving memory of Benon Lutaaya. Image courtesy of Nicole Rafiki.


Nicole Rafiki merges contemporary and traditional visual art. "Not without my bags" (2019)Image courtesy of Nicole Rafiki.


Nicole Rafiki merges contemporary and traditional visual art. "Kadogo (2019)"Image courtesy of Nicole Rafiki.


Nicole Rafiki merges contemporary and traditional visual art. "Mwenye imani haitaji macho" (A man of faith needs no eyes), (2019). Model: AfrogallonismImage courtesy of Nicole Rafiki.


Nicole Rafiki merges contemporary and traditional visual art. "Crown" (2020)Image courtesy of Nicole Rafiki.


Nicole Rafiki merges contemporary and traditional visual art. "Crown" (2020). Model: Deborah Kandoua AffouéImage courtesy of Nicole Rafiki.


Nicole Rafiki merges contemporary and traditional visual art. "Kwabende" (2019)Image courtesy of Nicole Rafiki.

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