Video

'Abidjan In Motion' Captures Côte d’Ivoire's Capital In Beautiful Time-Lapse

Beninese photographer Mayeul Akpovi captures "Abidjan In Motion" in an amazing new time-lapse video.


Beninese photographer Mayeul Akpovi uses artfully crafted time-lapse and hyper-lapse videos to showcase the architecture and landscapes of cities around the world. Akpovi created his first videos after moving to France, where he collected shots of Besançon and Paris to share with his family back in his hometown of Cotonou, Benin.

In his newest clip, Abidjan In Motion, the artist uses his unique videography technique –one that required 15 days of shooting, another 15 days of editing and the piecing together of 45,000 still photographs –to showcase the splendor of Francophone West Africa’s largest metropolis. The 3-minute clip gives viewers a speedy yet detailed digital tour of Côte d’Ivoire’s vibrant capital –from its bustling freeways and restaurants to the newly redesigned Hotel Ivoire.

Akpovi aims to challenge tired misconceptions of African cities with his creations. “I decided to make this project using African cities because during my stay in France, I realized that the West does not know Africa," he explained in an email to Okayafrica. "I had the opportunity to show people the Africa that they’ve never seen in the media.”

Explore Abidjan In Motion above and check out some photos from the making of the video below via Mayeul Akpovi's instagram.

#awesome #place. waiting for #sunset. #sofitel #hotelivoire #abidjan #abidjaninmotion by #mayeulakpovi #CotedIvoire #africa

A photo posted by Mayeul Akpovi (@mayeulak) on

#abidjan #CotedIvoire #hyperlapse 2016. #timelapse #africa #abidjaninmotion by #mayeulakpovi #comingsoon

A photo posted by Mayeul Akpovi (@mayeulak) on

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

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