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Addis' Art Scene: A New Exhibition Brings The Work Of 11 Ethiopian Artists From Addis Ababa To Nairobi

Circle Art Gallery's forthcoming group exhibition 'Addis Contemporary' brings the work of 11 Ethiopian artists from Addis Ababa to Nairobi.

All images courtesy of Circle Art Agency


Addis Contemporary is a new group exhibition that brings the work of eleven contemporary Ethiopian artists from Addis Ababa to Nairobi. Curated by Ethiopian gallerist Mifta Zeleke, the show, which opens June 18th at the Circle Art Gallery in Nairobi, looks to offer an overview of the Addis art scene with work from art school grads and current residents.

Among those presenting a critical reflection of Addis life are Dawit Abebe, Yosef LuleTesfaye BekeleSurafel Amare and his impressions from Banana DisplaysAddis Gezahegn's nostalgic fantasies of Old Town and Ephrem Solomon's solemn social commentary. Other works in the show reflect more artistic preoccupations, including Dawit Adnew's obsession with patterns, Kerima Ahmed's portrayal of contorted forms, Nebiat Abebe's exploration of movement, light and balance, Dereje Demissie's search for the link between identity and landscape, and Tamrat Gezahegn's meditation on indigenous knowledge and practice.

"There is a large community of artists in Addis who persevere despite a still-limited art audience in the country," Zeleke writes in an essay on the show." Though most contemporary artists live and work in Addis, their work depicts what is happening all over Ethiopia; the turbulence caused by the dramatic development and transformation of the country. These changes are a source of inspiration for most of the artists here."

'Addis Contemporary' opens June 18th at Circle Art Gallery in Nairobi.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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