News Brief
Photo by Roberto Ricciuti/Getty Images.

Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje’s ‘Farming’ Wins 'Best British Feature Film' at Edinburgh International Film Festival

The Nigerian-British actor's directorial debut, starring Nigerian actress Genenevieve Nnaji, continues to gain traction after a successful film festival run in 2018.

Farming, a film directed by Nigerian-British actor-turned-director/writer Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, has won the Michael Powell Award for 'Best British Feature Film' at the Edinburgh International Film Festival, Variety reports.


The film draws from Akinnuoye-Agbaje's own life his for his directorial debut, telling the story of Enitan (Damson Idris), a London-born Nigerian child who was intentionally placed in a white working-class home as part of a 1960s social experiment in hopes of giving him a brighter future. Enitan floats between cultures, where he ends up hanging with the wrong crowd becoming a leader of white skinhead gang.

In the film, Nollywood acting legend Genevieve Nnaji plays his distraught mother in an emotional role. As reported in PunchNG, having Nnaji star in his directorial debut is a dream come true for Akinnuoye-Agbaje. During promotion for the new film in Lagos the filmmaker said:

"To me, that was one of the sweetest triumphs. Marrying Hollywood, Nollywood, and bringing one of our stars on the big Hollywood platform. So I can't be happier. It's a dream of mine to marry the two industries and we've got to do that with her performance and also for the young Nigerian filmmakers as well."

FARMING | Official HD Clip (2018) | KATE BECKINSALE | Film Threat Clips youtu.be

"The unanimous decision of the Michael Powell Jury goes to an important, powerful and disturbing film from Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje," jury members Antonia Campbell-Hughes, David Hayman and Philip John say in a statement. "This story forces us to confront an unfamiliar, uncomfortable reality. Farming keeps you invested in its brutal world. Culturally adrenalising. Visceral. Inspirational."

The jury also awarded Idris the award for 'Best Performance in a British Feature Film' for his role.

Ghanaian-Belgian filmmaker Ben Asamoah also won big at the festival, snagging the 'Best Documentary Feature Film' for his debut, Sakawa, which follows unemployed youth in Ghana who dabble in internet romance scamming. Check out the trailer here.

popular
(Photo by Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images)

Chinonye Chukwu Will Direct the First Two Episodes of HBO Max's Upcoming 'Americanah' Series

Here's the latest news surrounding the highly-anticipated limited series, starring Lupita Nyong'o, Uzo Aduba and more.

Nigerian-American director Chinonye Chukwu is set to helm the first two episodes of the upcoming limited series Americanah, starring Lupita Nyong'o.

Chukwu is the award-winning filmmaker, behind the critically-acclaimed film Clemency, which won the 2019 Sundance Grand Jury Prize, making her the first Black woman to win the award.

Keep reading...
popular
Photo by Michael Kovac/Champagne Collet for Getty Images.

Cynthia Erivo Responds to Stephen King's Tweet on Diversity

The British-Nigerian actress begs to differ with the veteran author's tweet on diversity and 'quality' in this year's Oscar nominations.

British-Nigerian actress Cynthia Erivo has responded to veteran author Stephen King's recent tweets on the issue of diversity and this year's Oscar nominations.

King has been subject to considerable backlash since his controversial tweet about how he would "never consider diversity" when it comes to evaluating art of awards citing that, "It seems to me that to do otherwise would be wrong."

Keep reading...
popular
Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Keep reading...
popular

University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

Keep reading...

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.