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Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje’s ‘Farming’ Wins 'Best British Feature Film' at Edinburgh International Film Festival

The Nigerian-British actor's directorial debut, starring Nigerian actress Genenevieve Nnaji, continues to gain traction after a successful film festival run in 2018.

Farming, a film directed by Nigerian-British actor-turned-director/writer Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, has won the Michael Powell Award for 'Best British Feature Film' at the Edinburgh International Film Festival, Variety reports.


The film draws from Akinnuoye-Agbaje's own life his for his directorial debut, telling the story of Enitan (Damson Idris), a London-born Nigerian child who was intentionally placed in a white working-class home as part of a 1960s social experiment in hopes of giving him a brighter future. Enitan floats between cultures, where he ends up hanging with the wrong crowd becoming a leader of white skinhead gang.

In the film, Nollywood acting legend Genevieve Nnaji plays his distraught mother in an emotional role. As reported in PunchNG, having Nnaji star in his directorial debut is a dream come true for Akinnuoye-Agbaje. During promotion for the new film in Lagos the filmmaker said:

"To me, that was one of the sweetest triumphs. Marrying Hollywood, Nollywood, and bringing one of our stars on the big Hollywood platform. So I can't be happier. It's a dream of mine to marry the two industries and we've got to do that with her performance and also for the young Nigerian filmmakers as well."

FARMING | Official HD Clip (2018) | KATE BECKINSALE | Film Threat Clips youtu.be

"The unanimous decision of the Michael Powell Jury goes to an important, powerful and disturbing film from Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje," jury members Antonia Campbell-Hughes, David Hayman and Philip John say in a statement. "This story forces us to confront an unfamiliar, uncomfortable reality. Farming keeps you invested in its brutal world. Culturally adrenalising. Visceral. Inspirational."

The jury also awarded Idris the award for 'Best Performance in a British Feature Film' for his role.

Ghanaian-Belgian filmmaker Ben Asamoah also won big at the festival, snagging the 'Best Documentary Feature Film' for his debut, Sakawa, which follows unemployed youth in Ghana who dabble in internet romance scamming. Check out the trailer here.

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Photo by Giles Clarke/UNOCHA via Getty Images

Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

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Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.