Audio

Brotha Onaci x DrewCool 'Township Treats' Mixtape

Download Brotha Onaci x DrewCool's African electronic music "Township Treats" mixtape


Kwaito-obsessed selectors Brotha Onaci and DrewCool combine forces in the South African-heavy Township Treats mixtape. The mix draws inspirations from DrewCool's "numerous trips to South Africa, [through which] he was drawn to house music and immersed... into the township sounds of Pretoria, Durban, and Soweto." For more from the artists, check out Brotha Onaci's Africa In Your Earbuds tape and DrewCool's Mzansi Unearthed mixes. Download the hour-long Township Treats below.

Track List

01. Aero Manyelo - “Just In Time”

02. Mzee - "Zvinosiririsa (Morra Derey Watcha Mix)"

03. Monotone - "Invitation to Dance" F. RubyGold

04. Mzee - "Mahuwelele F. Candy Nurse (Mzee's Tribal Mix)"

05. Mashabela Galane - “Papago (DJ Whisky Mix)”

06. Infinite Boys - “Teka Teka” F. Coco

07. Black Motion - “Wumi Wango (Motion Drum)” F. SoulFlow

08. Queens of Dance - “Thamba Wena”

09. Oskido - “DJ’s Manifest” F. Character

10. Oskido ft Dr Malinga - “Moshito”

11. Black Motion ft Candy - “Tsa Mandebele”

12. Black Motion - “The Documentary”

13. Black Motion - “Thrills”

14. DJ Cleo - “Gangnam Style”

15. Aero Manyelo ft DJ Tira & Amenisto - “Imhlola ka James”

16. Aero Manyelo - “Black Blue Green”

17. Aero Manyelo - “More Energy”

18. Masters at Work - “Work (Uhuru Remix)”

19. DJ Choice ft McKenzie - “Mapantsula”

20. Professor - “Umuntu”

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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