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Gallery: Africa Fashion Week London [Day 2]

This is the second day's gallery recap of the Africa Fashion Week London 2013.

This was our favorite day on the entire Africa Fashion Week London event. An experience full of beauty and creativity, the designers involved were clearly inspired for these new collections. The creative process is something unique to each individual and on Day 2, we witnessed different strong handcrafts and signatures from the likes of M-Shade, Ruuts Arts and Creation, Slu by Sluuvin Designs, Thula Sindi, Giberky, Moofa, Crown Rose, Rya-V Jewelry and Established Beauxtique — all names to remember. They brought us a true modern African view on what's really happening on the continent style-wise, highlighting the international trendsetter and a place in constant evolution. Enjoy the recap gallery above and check out our gallery from AFWL Day 1.


 

 

 

 

News Brief
(Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

Pregnant Tanzanian Girls Now Have Hope Of An Education

In the past, Tanzania's pregnant girls of school-going age were banned from accessing an education. However, things are about to change!

If a young girl of school-going age happened to fall pregnant in Tanzania, it usually spelled the end of her schooling career — and the death of any prospects she may have had for a bright future. In Tanzania currently, an estimated 5 500 girls are forced to leave school each year due to pregnancy, according to the World Bank.

The Tanzanian government has announced a new programme aimed at addressing the plight of young girls who have been impacted by this discriminatory ban. Tanzania's Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Leonard Akwilapo said young girls will now be offered an opportunity to further their schooling at alternative colleges.

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