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AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #16: PETITE NOIR

Download noir wave founder Petite Noir's vibrant 56-minute South African house-tinged Africa In Your Earbuds mixtape.


Petite Noir is a South African/Congolese drone producer who also puts in time as the lead singer of Cape Town's Popskarr and member of The Capital of Cool collective. He self-dubbed his musical style noir wave — "a take on post-punk/new wave with a hint of an African aesthetic."

For our latest Africa In Your Earbuds, Petite Noir serves up a vibrant 56-minute South African house-tinged mix featuring Spoek Mathambo's remix of Seun Kuti, DJ Sbu and Zahara's "Lengoma", Alec Lomami and more. Explaining his selections, he states:

The reason my mix is predominantly South African is because it comes from a place that basically raised me. Coming to South Africa from Beligium, always having North African music playing and always listening to what my parents listened to, it somehow had some sort of relevance and made sense to me. I'm all for vernacular music, even though I might not understand what they are saying most of the time. I always use SA music as one of my influences.

Stream and download AIYE #15: Waves Generation below! Big up to Underdog for the cover artwork!

TRACKLIST

1. Sepulcure - The One (UK)

2. Dj Kent ft. Maleh - Falling (SA)

3.Big Nuz - Umlilo (SA)

4. Dj Clock Feat. Shisaboi - Ngomso (SA)

5. Fali feat. Olivia - Chaise Electric (DRC)

6. Alec Lomami - POP (DRC/USA)

7. DJ Sbu feat. Zahara - Lengoma (Petite Noir Chopped and screwed edit) (SA)

8. Flava - Sawa Le (NGA)

9. Fela Kuti - Water No Get No Enemy (NGA)

10. Amadou & Mariam - Dougou Badia Feat. Santigold (MLI/USA)

11. Petite Noir - 'till we ghosts/The Dance (DRC/ANG/SA)

12. Seun Kuti - The Good Leaf (Spoek Mathambo Remix) (NGA/SA)

Previously on Africa In Your Earbuds: OLUGBENGA, RICH MEDINA, VOICES OF BLACK, LAMIN FOFANA, CHICO MANNDJ UNDERDOGDJ OBAHSABINEBROTHA ONACIDJ AQBTJUST A BANDSTIMULUSQOOL DJ MARVSINKANECHIEF BOIMA.

Op-Ed
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Three years later, Petite Noir has returned with a six-track EP and an accompanying four-track short film that delves considerably deeper into noirwave and his Congolese roots. The music of La Maison Noir / The Black House and its introspective 18-minute film explores ideas of gender, identity as a migrant, and political resistance.

A young Yannick Illunga and his family fled the Democratic Republic of Congo and went into exile after his father faced threats as a former minister of the DRC. They emigrated to Belgium and France before settling permanently in Cape Town.

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