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Diaspora Eats: 7 African Restaurants in New York City That You Need to Try

Here are seven African restaurants to check out in New York City.

It’s “No Borders” month here at OkayAfrica, which means we'll be highlighting travel and intercontinental relations between people on the continent and in the diaspora.


Food is a major part of the traveling experience, and if your like us, then you're looking for tasty delectables in any city that you might find yourself in. Good food only amplifies the traveling experience and thankfully, the diaspora is brimming with a variety of restaurants that offer savory dishes that'll make your trip even more memorable. They might even remind you of mom's cooking.

Whether you’re looking for options to fit your dietary restrictions or you’re simply looking to stuff your face with quality eats, there’s a spot in the city that will cater to your palette. Below are 8 African restaurants to check out while you’re in New York City.

Check out some of the best African food in HoustonLondon, DC, and Paris

La Savane

Located in Harlem, The Guinean and Ivorian-owned restaurant offers a plethora of West African dishes, and specializes in Ivorian classics like attiéké and foutou served with a variety of soups including okra and tomato stew with peppers.

Ponty Bistro

With locations in Harlem and Gamercy, this fine-dining establishment offers a unique menu of Senegalese-French fusion, which includes dishes like Le Poulet Tagine, a chicken dish served with diced tomatoes and couscous, as well as an extensive selection of seafood entrees.

DF Nigerian Food Truck

The vibrant DF Nigerian Food Truck can be spotted in Midtown, generally around 44th street and 2nd avenue. It's the stop if you're looking to get your fix of Nigerian jollof, fried rice, honey beans and pepper stew, suya and more.

Madiba

Located on Dekalb Ave in Brooklyn, the popular spot serves flavorful South African dishes in a colorful and casual atmosphere. You can try their beef and egg-based bobotie if you're looking for a traditional South African meal, and if you're in the mood for a meaty meal, try the classic  sausage dish, pap and boerewors.

Awash Ethiopian Restaurant

The well-known spot serves Ethiopian staples in locations across Manhattan and Brooklyn. Choose from their classic menu items like Shiro, Doro Wat, or Yebeg Tibs or try the Awash Special which comes with kitfo, marinated beef, lamb and seasoned veggies. It's a prime spot for vegans and vegetarians, as injera the sour-dough flatbread central to Ethiopian cuisine, is naturally vegan.

Ethiopian for dinner!

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Farafina Cafe & Lounge

Farafina Cafe & Lounge in Harlem offers an array of West African dishes, like Senegalese yassa and groundnut stew. It's appeal goes beyond just the food—get the full experience by catching some of the live performances by local talent and ordering from their extensive menu of drinks and cocktails.

Accra Restaurant

This Harlem-based eatery offers Ghanian quick-bites like fried yam served with peppers, and fried fish with plantain. If your tastes fall on the Ghanaian side of the jollof rice spectrum, then Accra Restaurant should be on your list of stops.

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Photo by Cellou Binani/AFP via Getty Images

Two Protesters Have Been Killed During Continued Anti-Government Protests in Guinea

Thousands of Guineans continue to protest against President Alpha Condé seeking a third term.

Guinea continues to be engulfed in anti-government protests which started in mid-October of last year. The protests are in response to proposed amendments to the West African country's constitution which will see President Alpha Condé running for a third term in this year's elections.

According to the BBC, two protesters have been shot dead during the anti-government protests which have brought Guinea to a standstill.

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Photo by Xaume Olleros/Getty Images.

Malian Government Claims Anti-Trump Tweets Were a 'Handling Error'

A former Malian government official allegedly used President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita's official Twitter account to describe Trump's recent drone strike on Iraq as a "fuck up".

This past Monday, a number of tweets which referred to President Donald Trump's recent drone strike on Iraq as a "fuck up", were sent from Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita's official Twitter account.

According to News24, the Malian government now claims that the since-deleted tweet was a a result of a "handling error" after a former government official mistook the Twitter account as his own personal one.

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Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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