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Diaspora Eats: 7 African Restaurants in New York City That You Need to Try

Here are seven African restaurants to check out in New York City.

It’s “No Borders” month here at OkayAfrica, which means we'll be highlighting travel and intercontinental relations between people on the continent and in the diaspora.


Food is a major part of the traveling experience, and if your like us, then you're looking for tasty delectables in any city that you might find yourself in. Good food only amplifies the traveling experience and thankfully, the diaspora is brimming with a variety of restaurants that offer savory dishes that'll make your trip even more memorable. They might even remind you of mom's cooking.

Whether you’re looking for options to fit your dietary restrictions or you’re simply looking to stuff your face with quality eats, there’s a spot in the city that will cater to your palette. Below are 8 African restaurants to check out while you’re in New York City.

Check out some of the best African food in HoustonLondon, DC, and Paris

La Savane

Located in Harlem, The Guinean and Ivorian-owned restaurant offers a plethora of West African dishes, and specializes in Ivorian classics like attiéké and foutou served with a variety of soups including okra and tomato stew with peppers.

Ponty Bistro

With locations in Harlem and Gamercy, this fine-dining establishment offers a unique menu of Senegalese-French fusion, which includes dishes like Le Poulet Tagine, a chicken dish served with diced tomatoes and couscous, as well as an extensive selection of seafood entrees.

DF Nigerian Food Truck

The vibrant DF Nigerian Food Truck can be spotted in Midtown, generally around 44th street and 2nd avenue. It's the stop if you're looking to get your fix of Nigerian jollof, fried rice, honey beans and pepper stew, suya and more.

Madiba

Located on Dekalb Ave in Brooklyn, the popular spot serves flavorful South African dishes in a colorful and casual atmosphere. You can try their beef and egg-based bobotie if you're looking for a traditional South African meal, and if you're in the mood for a meaty meal, try the classic  sausage dish, pap and boerewors.

Awash Ethiopian Restaurant

The well-known spot serves Ethiopian staples in locations across Manhattan and Brooklyn. Choose from their classic menu items like Shiro, Doro Wat, or Yebeg Tibs or try the Awash Special which comes with kitfo, marinated beef, lamb and seasoned veggies. It's a prime spot for vegans and vegetarians, as injera the sour-dough flatbread central to Ethiopian cuisine, is naturally vegan.

Ethiopian for dinner!

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Farafina Cafe & Lounge

Farafina Cafe & Lounge in Harlem offers an array of West African dishes, like Senegalese yassa and groundnut stew. It's appeal goes beyond just the food—get the full experience by catching some of the live performances by local talent and ordering from their extensive menu of drinks and cocktails.

Accra Restaurant

This Harlem-based eatery offers Ghanian quick-bites like fried yam served with peppers, and fried fish with plantain. If your tastes fall on the Ghanaian side of the jollof rice spectrum, then Accra Restaurant should be on your list of stops.

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Uganda Has Lost Millions of Internet Users as a Result of Its Controversial Social Media Tax

The infamous tax is effectually driving Ugandans off the internet.

The number of internet users in Uganda has declined significantly since the implementation of the highly-criticized tax on social media, which went into effect in July of last year.

While the government claimed that the tax would assist in raising government revenue and help "maintain the security of the country and extend electricity so that you people can enjoy more of social media, more often, more frequently," said Uganda's Finance Minister Matia Kasaija at the time. President Museveni also suggested that the tax would help "curb gossip" online.

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The 14 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Riky Rick, Mr Eazi, Moonchild Sanelly, Burna Boy, Blinky Bill, Niniola and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow OkayAfrica on Spotify and Apple Music to get immediate updates every week and read about some of our selections ahead.

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Oyinkan Braithwaite's 'My Sister the Serial Killer' Is the Lagos-Set Novel Rocking the Crime Thriller Genre

We speak with the Nigerian author about the success of her debut novel, and breaking the boundaries of "African Lit."

"I have always been drawn to dark topics," says Oyinkan Braithwaite, the 30-year-old Nigerian author behind the critical darling of a novel My Sister, the Serial Killer.

Her declaration helps explain the subject and title of her debut novel, which tells the story of Ayoola, a young woman who has developed a not-so-healthy habit of murdering her boyfriends, leaving her older sister, the book's protagonist, Korede to clean up her mess. You may have noticed it's ubiquitous cover—which features a young black woman wearing a headwrap, casually looking on as a knife-wielding hands is reflected in her sunglasses—on your timeline or at your local store. The internationally-released, Nigerian-made novel sits confidently on retail shelves previously reserved for mass-market thrillers.

The dark and humorous, Lagos-set novel is extreme—but not just because of all the murdering that happens. It also examines the extreme nature of the many things that can push people to the edge. For the sisters, it's: intergenerational trauma, abuse, the prevalence of a culture that rewards beauty above all else, as well as having to battle with their own personal shortcomings—just to name a few.

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