Audio

Weekend Burners: Best Tracks of the Week

Download the best African music tracks released this week.


Photography/Art by Paul Sika.

We realize our site cycles through an, at times, overwhelming number of videos, tracks, remixes and mixtapes from a deluge of African/diaspora artists that not everyone is familiar with — in fact, we've gotten a large amount of reader feedback stating so. With Weekend Burners we aim to address that by highlighting our choices of the best music content that made it on the blog throughout the week. Get 'em below straight from the Okayafrica bunker:

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Premiere: Kae Sun ‘Afriyie’ [Album Stream]

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Premiere: South Africa’s Flame, Umlilo ‘Living Dangerously’

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Camp Mulla ‘All In’ ft. M.anifest + ‘oH mA gAd’

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Zongo Junction ‘Elephant & Mosquito’ (Captain Planet Remix)

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Benin City ‘Faithless’

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Brotha Onaci x DrewCool ‘Township Treats’ Mixtape

Interview
Photo by Toka Hlongwane.

Toka Hlongwane’s Photo Series ‘Impilo ka Darkie’ Aims to Give an Insight Into Black South Africans’ Experiences

With his latest photo series, 'Impilo ka Darkie', South African photographer Toka Hlongwane offers an imperfect but compelling insight into the lives of the people he has encountered through his travels.

Toka Hlongwane is a Johannesburg-based documentary photographer whose work often casts a lens on society's underclass. His most recent photo series, Impilo ka Darkie, shot over five years, is Hlongwane's attempt to answer two questions: what does it mean to be Black? And, above that, what is the measure of Black life?

Part of Impilo ka Darkie's appeal is that it also documents Hlongwane's growth as a photographer. As the years roll on, his composition becomes stronger, the focus on his pictures becomes much sharper and a storyline begins to emerge in his work.

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