Audio

AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #36: OLD MONEY - 'NO DEATH'

Download Bedstuy beatmakers Old Money's mixtape of "occult" African music.


Old Money is the joint moniker of Bedstuy, BK beatmakers/MCs Scheme and Andre Oswald, a pair that take cross-continental sonic cues from favelas, townships & projects and  filter them through their unique Afro-Caribbean lens.

For Africa In Your Earbuds #36: "No Death" Old Money present an outstanding 51-minute mix enwrapped in ancient and modern African spiritual systems that lie outside of mainstream religion — practices onlookers might tag as devil's worship or the occult. The mix is a journey through black/African worship, which Old Money cryptically describe:

Death is an illusion.

Death is an illusion.

Death is an illusion.

Death is an illusion.

No Death.

Stream and download AIYE #36: Old Money - "No Death."  View the Mega Max cover art above and see after the jump for more mixtape artwork from Mega and Lichiban. Follow Old Money on Twitter / Soundcloud.

TRACKLIST

Mos Def - The Boogie Man Song (US)

Rev. Roger L. Worthy & Bonnie Woodstock - Get Back Satan (US)

Mississippi Nightingales - Don't Let Him Ride (US)

Max Romeo - I Chase The Devil (Jamaica)

Jay Electronica - Exhibit A: Transformations (US)

DMX - Damien (US)

Exuma - Mama Loi, Papa Loi (Bahamas)

Moodymann - Black Sunday (US)

Bucie - Set Your Soul Free (South Africa)

Tracy Chapman - Crossroads: Boddhi Satva Remix (US/Central African Republic)

Twinny Tee feat. Deep Cee - Bongola Ceremony (South Africa)

C. William - Origin Of Sin Editvolum (South Africa)

Cianda - Battles In The Galaxy: Ciandas Main Mix (South Africa)

Culoe De Song - Webaba (South Africa)

DJ Phat Cat - Return From The Dead (South Africa)

Black Motion - Drums Of Kalawa (South Africa)

Actress - Raven (UK)

DVA - Reach The Sun (UK)

Glasser - Home: DJ Spoko Remix (US/South Africa)

Mephisto Odyssey - Rites of Passage (US)

JR - Deep Tribes: Original Mix

Lamin Fofana - Dance In Yr Blood (US/Sierra Leone)

Moroka - The Creep: Moroka's Anthem (UK)

Spoek Mathambo - Gwababa: Don't Be Scared (South Africa)

Os Kazumbis - Kazumbis (Angola)

NaZaretH - Osiris (Angola)

Light Asylum - Dark Allies (US)

Group of Maroons of Moore Town - Hear When De Duppy Bawl (Jamaica)

Like African music? Previously on Africa In Your Earbuds: DJ NEPTUNESAHEL SOUNDSBEATENBERGM1 [DEAD PREZ]BODDHI SATVAL’AFRIQUE SOM SYSTEMENOMADIC WAXTHE BROTHER MOVES ONLVBEN ASSITER [JAMES BLAKE'S DRUMMER]JAKOBSNAKECHRISTIAN TIGER SCHOOLSAUL WILLIAMSTUNE-YARDSMATHIEU SCHREYERBLK JKSALEC LOMAMIDJ MOMAAWESOME TAPES FROM AFRICAPETITE NOIROLUGBENGARICH MEDINA, VOICES OF BLACK, LAMIN FOFANA, CHICO MANNDJ UNDERDOGDJ OBAHSABINEBROTHA ONACIDJ AQBTJUST A BANDSTIMULUSQOOL DJ MARVSINKANECHIEF BOIMA

 

Interview

Interview: The Awakening of Bas

We talk to Bas about The Messenger, Bobi Wine, Sudan, and the globalized body of Black pain.

The first thing you notice when you begin to listen to The Messenger—the new investigative documentary podcast following the rise of Ugandan singer, businessman and revolutionary political figure Bobi Wine—is Bas' rich, paced, and deeply-affecting storytelling voice.

Whether he is talking about Uganda's political landscape, painting a picture of Bobi Wine's childhood, or drawing parallels between the violence Black bodies face in America and the structural oppression Africans on the continent continue to endure at the hands of corrupt government administrations, there is no doubt that Bas (real name Abbas Hamad) has an intimate understanding of what he's talking about.

We speak via Zoom, myself in Lagos, and him in his home studio in Los Angeles where he spends most of his time writing as he cools off from recording the last episode of The Messenger. It's evident that the subject matter means a great deal to the 33-year-old Sudanese-American rapper, both as a Black man living in America and one with an African heritage he continues to maintain deep ties with. The conversation around Black bodies enduring various levels of violence is too urgent and present to ignore and this is why The Messenger is a timely and necessary cultural work.

Below, we talk with Bas aboutThe Messenger podcast, Black activism, growing up with parents who helped shape his political consciousness and the globalized body of Black pain.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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