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Deeper Than The Headlines: Slavery's Global Comeback, Mali Crisis, Senegal Street Photography & More

Check out the latest news on Africa for the week of Dec 16-20th, with in-depth African news featuring opinion pieces from global sources.


This week we continue to bring you the latest news on Africa with selections from different media outlets around the globe. Be sure to check back each Thursday for pieces that dig deeper than the headlines on the latest news on Africa!

1. Nigeria: Curbing Violence in Nigeria (I) - the Jos Crisis

By: International Crisis Group Report

This International Crisis Group report is quite an informative read for those unaware of the crisis in Jos and Middle Belt region of Nigeria. At least one thousand civilians and children have died over the past 3 years, and while many are aware of the violence it has not gained much visibility in global media outlets. The report provides context for the violence and also deconstructs how Nigeria's various definitions of 'citizen' and 'resident' are at the root of the violence: "The Jos crisis is the result of failure to amend the constitution to privilege broad-based citizenship over exclusive indigene status and ensure that residency rather than indigeneity determines citizens’ rights." The report concludes with recommendations specifically for national and state governments, as well as international agencies such as the UN.

2. Slavery's Global Comeback

By: J.J. Gould

Is trafficking a modern day institution of slavery? This is the question explored by J.J. Gould in The Atlantic: "As pervasive as contemporary slavery is, it hasn't come clearly into focus as a global issue until relatively recently. There are a couple of big reasons why -- one having to do with the scale of the problem, the other with the concept of slavery itself." The article doesn't specifically focus on slavery in various parts of Africa, rather Gould is more interested in problematizing the difficulty we have in recognizing and classifying slavery today given its historical context. The comments below the article are kind of intense, but they signify that this is definitely a controversial topic that we need to unpack.

3. Interview: Mo Ibrahim

By: Eleanor Whitehead

In an interview with Eleanor Whitehead for This Is Africa, we get to hear Mo Ibrahim discuss transparency in African businesses and issues of governance on the continent. Here's a quick snippet: "More broadly, Mr Ibrahim is bullish on the continent’s democratic direction. “A so-called Arab Spring can come in many forms – not only in the form of demonstrations. I think that a lot of African countries have gone through Springs in their own quiet way. There are maybe 30 African countries where peaceful change of power is in place; where reasonable elections are taking place and people come in and leave in an orderly fashion; where there is more space for civil society. So we are moving and slowly we are getting there. We need to see more of that.”

4. Mali's Crisis: Is the Plan for Western Intervention 'Crap'?

By: Bruce Crumley

For Time World Bruce Crumley explores the Mali Crisis through an examination of how the Mali Crisis is also engaged ind discussions of the West's patterns of intervention in non-Western spaces. Crumley notes that "while there’s virtually total agreement within the international community that something must be done to force out the Islamist militants occupying northern Mali"  how to achieve it is extremely debatable. So far, officials in the West (specifically the US and France) have yet to agree on the magnitude of the Islamist militants in the North. Check out the article for a quick recap on what's happening in Mali, and the little dance Western governments perform before deciding if intervention in Africa is worthy of their time.

5. Senegal Street Photography

By: Anthony Kurtz

From African Digital Art, use some different cognitive skills and check out Anthony Kurzt's striking street photography of Senegal. Photographed in 2011, Kurtz took the photos while volunteering from the U.S. We know, it has that whole "I studied abroad in Africa and took cool pictures of the locals" kind of thing going, but Kurtz beats us to the punch. He states, "when I wasn’t needed, I photographed people in the village of Dindefelo (south of Senegal) where we were volunteering for three weeks. After “work” was over, I headed to Dakar to do more “strobist” style, street photography and worked on different personal projects. It is sometimes hard to convince people that your are taking these pictures because of your love for people and places with, what I define as, true character. I’m very glad I didn’t give up and I want to thank those who agreed to let me photograph them. I made sure people in Dindefelo received copies of their portraits and I hope they enjoy looking at them." Food for thought I guess.

The archive:

12/13/12 "Nelson Mandela, Ghana's Election + More"

12/6/12- “Susan Rice, Drones, Anti-Gay Laws + More”

11/29/12- “Chimamanda Adichie’s Tribute, Violence in the DRC + 16 Days of Activism”

11/15/12 – “Infiltrators” in Israel, Southern Arab Spring, Bono’s African Expertise

11/8/12 - Africa’s 1%, Mau Mau, and a Polemic against NGOs

11/1/12 - Biafra, Football, Victoire Ingabire + More!

10/25/12 - Aluu 4, Herero Genocide, EU Nobel Prize + More!

10/18/12 - Die Antwoord, Mo Ibrahim, Thomas Sankara + More!

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Artwork: Barthélémy Toguo Lockdown Selfportrait 10, 2020. Courtesy Galerie Lelong & Co

1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair Goes to Paris in 2021

The longstanding celebration of African art will be hosted by Parisian hot spot Christie's for the first time ever.

In admittedly unideal circumstances, 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair will be touching French soil in 2021. The internationally celebrated art fair devoted to contemporary art from Africa and the African diaspora will be hosted in Paris, France from January 20 - 23. With COVID-19 still having its way around the globe, finding new ways to connect is what it's all about and 1-54 is certainly taking the innovative steps to keep African art alive and well.
In partnership with Christie's, the in-person exhibits will take place at the auction house's city HQ at Avenue Matignon, while 20 international exhibitors will be featured online at Christies.com. And the fun doesn't stop there as the collaboration has brought in new ways to admire the talent from participating galleries from across Africa and Europe. The fair's multi-disciplinary program of talks, screenings, performances, workshops, and readings are set to excite and entice revelers.

Artwork: Delphine Desane Deep Sorrow, 2020. Courtesy Luce Gallery


The tech dependant program, curated by Le 18, a multi-disciplinary art space in Marrakech medina, will see events take place during the Parisian run fair, followed by more throughout February.
This year's 1-54 online will be accessible to global visitors virtually, following the success of the 2019's fair in New York City and London in 2020. In the wake of COVID-19 related regulations and public guidelines, 1-54 in collaboration with Christie's Paris is in compliance with all national regulations, strict sanitary measures, and security.

Artwork: Cristiano Mongovo Murmurantes Acrilico Sobre Tela 190x200cm 2019


1-54 founding director Touria El Glaoui commented, "Whilst we're sad not to be able to go ahead with the fourth edition of 1-54 Marrakech in February as hoped, we are incredibly excited to have the opportunity to be in Paris this January with our first-ever fair on French soil thanks to our dedicated partners Christie's. 1-54's vision has always been to promote vibrant and dynamic contemporary art from a diverse set of African perspectives and bring it to new audiences, and what better way of doing so than to launch an edition somewhere completely new. Thanks to the special Season of African Culture in France, 2021 is already set to be a great year for African art in the country so we are excited to be playing our part and look forward, all being well, to welcoming our French friends to Christie's and many more from around the world to our online fair in January."

Julien Pradels, General Director of Christie's France, said, "Christie's is delighted to announce our second collaboration with 1-54, the Contemporary African Art Fair, following a successful edition in London this October. Paris, with its strong links to the continent, is a perfect place for such a project and the additional context of the delayed Saison Africa 2020 makes this partnership all the more special. We hope this collaboration will prove a meaningful platform for the vibrant African art scene and we are confident that collectors will be as enthusiastic to see the works presented, as we are."


Artwork: Kwesi Botchway Metamorphose in July, 2020. Courtesy of the artist and Gallery 1957


Here's a list of participating galleries to be on the lookout for:

Galleries

31 PROJECT (Paris, France)
50 Golborne (London, United Kingdom)
Dominique Fiat (Paris, France)
Galerie 127 (Marrakech, Morocco)
Galerie Anne de Villepoix (Paris, France)
Galerie Cécile Fakhoury (Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire/ Dakar, Senegal)
Galerie Eric Dupont (Paris, France)
Galerie Lelong & Co. (Paris, France / New York, USA)
Galerie Nathalie Obadia (Paris, France / Brussels, Belgium)
Galleria Continua (Beijing, China / Havana, Cuba / Les Moulins, France / San Gimignano, Italy / Rome, Italy)
Gallery 1957 (Accra, Ghana / London, United Kingdom)
Loft Art Gallery (Casablanca, Morocco)

Luce Gallery (Turin, Italy)
MAGNIN-A (Paris, France)
Nil Gallery (Paris, France)
POLARTICS (Lagos, Nigeria)
SEPTIEME Gallery (Paris, France)
This is Not a White Cube (Luanda, Angola) THK Gallery (Cape Town, South Africa) Wilde (Geneva, Switzerland)

For more info visit 1-54

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